Reunions 2018 Immigration Panel Speakers

June 1, 2:00pm – 3:30pm
In the Service of Humanity: Empowering Immigrant Communities (Panel)
Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Room A32.

Phillip Connor *10 is a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. He is an expert on international migration, immigrant integration and immigrant religion in the United States, Canada and Europe. Connor prepares reports on immigration and religion, consults with demographic and public opinion researchers at the Center on migration aspects of their work, and analyses data. Before joining Pew Research Center, Connor received his doctorate in sociology at Princeton University. He was the lead author of the Center’s reports Faith on the Move and Still in Limbo: About a Million Asylum Seekers Await Word on Whether They Can Call Europe Home. He is also the author of the book Immigrant Faith and has published several academic articles in leading migration and religion journals. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Time and the Economist.

 


Maribel Hernández Rivera, Esq. *10 is a long time immigrant rights advocate and an accomplished public interest lawyer. She has experience in direct services, project management, and policymaking. As head of the NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs’ Legal Initiatives, Maribel is responsible for managing and promoting innovative access to justice programs for immigrants including ActionNYC and NYCitizenship.  Maribel previously served as Supervising Attorney at Immigrant Justice Corps where she directly supervised Department of Justice Accredited Representatives as they helped low-income New Yorkers apply for immigration benefits. Maribel is also a former Fried Frank/ MALDEF fellow.  As a fellow, she represented individuals in immigration detention, submitted an amicus brief to the Supreme Court in support of the U.S. government in the Arizona v. United States case, and participated in a group advocating for the representation of people in immigration detention.  Maribel received her J.D. from New York University School of Law, her Masters in Public Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and her A.B. from Harvard University.  Upon law school graduation, Maribel served as law clerk to the Honorable Mary M. Schroeder in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.


José Quiñonez *98 is Mission Asset Fund’s (MAF) founding CEO.
Under his leadership, he quickly built MAF into an award-winning nonprofit with innovative nationwide models for integrating financially excluded, low-income communities into the financial mainstream. For his work, he was awarded the MacArthur ‘Genius’ Fellowship, the Ashoka Fellowship, and the Aspen Institute Fellowship. He also received the James Irvine Leadership Award and Princeton University’s WWS Distinguished Alumni Award, among others.
José is a visionary leader, highly regarded in the consumer finance field. Currently, he serves in Consumer Advisory Boards for the Federal Reserve Bank of SF, US Bank, Experian, and Capital One. In 2012, he was appointed by the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as the inaugural Chair of the Consumer Advisory Board. Governor Brown enacted legislation recognizing MAF’s Lending Circles program, making California the first state to lift up credit building as a force for good.
José is a passionate advocate for social justice. He is a former Congressional legislative assistant, and a nonprofit lobbyist in Washington, D.C. where he advocated for federal policy change regarding immigration, hunger and welfare reform.
José graduated from the University of California at Davis, and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.


Maya Wahrman ’16 is the Program Assistant in Forced Migration at the Office of Religious Life (ORL) at Princeton University, where she co-designs and administrates the ORL’s Interfaith Program in Refugees and Forced Migration. Last year she served as the Communications Coordinator at ORL through a Princeton Project 55 Fellowship.

Through her fellowship, Maya co-curated the international interdisciplinary conference of over 300 participants, Seeking Refuge: Faith-Based Approaches to Forced Migration. She has now assisted the office in acquiring two grants to sustain their innovative interfaith refugee program. This year she organized a high-profile policy forum about the role of religion in domestic refugee integration, internships for Princeton undergraduates with refugee service and policy organizations, and a service-learning project with local Central American unaccompanied minors and Princeton history students. Maya has invested in local and national expertise in refugees and forced migration through her work, her Arabic and Spanish skills, and her personal commitments, serving as a volunteer to detained asylum-seekers in the Elizabeth Detention Center, a member of Interfaith-RISE (a resettlement network in Highland Park), and a volunteer with the Neighborhood Sanctuary Alliance. Maya also served this past year as a peer tutor to Syrian refugees participating in a Princeton online history course from a refugee camp in Northern Jordan, tutoring online with two on-site visits to the camp and undergoing intensive training around Higher Education in Emergencies.

Maya graduated in 2016 from the History Department at Princeton University, with certificates in Near Eastern Studies and Creative Writing. She has published several opinion pieces using history to advocate for just solutions to the refugee crisis and for asylum seekers in the US.


 

Bold Idea Update

160 attend webinar on trauma and mental health in immigrant and refugee communities

As part of the Bold Idea initiative, Princeton AlumniCorps and Appleseed hosted a webinar presentation and Q & A on the topic of trauma and mental health in immigrant and refugee communities. One-hundred and sixty viewers from all over the United States tuned in to listen and learn from Dr. Usha Tummala-Narra and Dr. Maria Nardone about the various aspects of trauma, including the effects of the current political climate on mental wellness and the generational impact of chronic stress on immigrant families.

A girl holding a doll, arrives with others migrants at the refugee center in the town of Presevo, after walking from Macedonia to Serbia on August 26, 2015. At least 2,000 more migrants flooded overnight into Serbia in a desperate journey to try and go on to Hungary, the door into the European Union, a UN official said on August 24. More than 9,000 people, mostly Syrian refugees, have arrived to Serbia those last three days. AFP PHOTO / ARMEND NIMANI

The Bold Idea initiative seeks to bring together practitioners, academics, policymakers, and funders from both within and beyond the AlumniCorps network for dialogue and action over a three-year period. The current iteration of the Bold Idea is a two-year pilot focusing on immigration issues. AlumniCorps, in partnership with Appleseed, a network of 17 public interest centers in the United States and Mexico, received a grant from the Hewlett Foundation to promote network-based collaboration focused on the issues facing immigrants and refugees.

Get free access to the recorded webinar here. To learn more about empowering immigrant communities, come to our Princeton Reunions 2018 panel, In the Service of Humanity: Empowering Immigrant Communities on Friday, June 1 at 2:00pm in the Neuroscience Building. Get more details here.

In Memoriam: Ethel Lipsitz s’55

Ethel Lipsitz s’55– February 23, 2018

Ethel was the widow of Hilary Lipsitz ’55, and remained an active AlumniCorps supporter and generous donor after Hilary’s passing in August 2016. She was the Director of Development for the Collegiate School from 1985 – 2000. Writing of Mrs. Lipsitz, current Collegiate Headmaster Lee Levison observed that Mrs. Lipsitz’ “Dignity and grace were palpable – and radiated throughout [a] room. Being in her presence made us all better.” Read Ethel’s full obituary in the New York Times online here.

Regional Updates – Spring 2018

Boston

Cassie Crifase ’17 and Daniel Rounds ’17, current PP55 Fellows in Boston.

The six Fellows in Boston have been busy! In particular, two future physicians reflected on how much their Fellowships are teaching them in our Leading Edge blog. Daniel Rounds ’17 is providing a quality education for young students in Lawrence, MA at Community Day Arlington Elementary School. He shared, “Lawrence is a city defined by immigration, and I hope to work with migrant populations in the future as a physician.”

Cassie Crifase ’17 is working on a longitudinal airway study at Massachusetts General Hospital’s EMNet, and she says, “Working on the WIND Study has granted me a unique window into the lives of our participants, offering me multiple perspectives into the storied history of each parent and child… it has instilled a fervor for my chosen career as a physician as well as a humanity that can sometimes be lost in the study of a physiology textbook or the sterility of an operating theatre.” Read all of Cassie & Daniel’s reflections on The Leading Edge blog.


Chicago

In Chicago several Princeton AlumniCorps Fellows and former Fellows attended an event at the Princeton Club of Chicago on March 27, 2018. Juan Jose Gonzalez ‘06 spoke about his role as Director of Youth and Education policy for the City of Chicago, while Chris Mallette ‘93, Executive Director of the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, a part of National Network for Safe Communities, shared his experience in public service. Pictured, left to right: Juan Jose Gonzalez ’06, Whitney Spalding Spencer ’07, Josh Lau s’07, Felix Huang ’07, Nora Niazian ’17, Kirsten Ekdahl Hull ’99, Adjoa Mante ’17, Briana Payton ’17, Rebecca Deaton ’91, Andrew Hahm ’17, Nat Piggee ’96, and Chris Mallette ’93.

On February 21, Chicago Fellows got the chance to learn from Seth Green ’01 (pictured above with a tie), Founding Director of the Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility at Loyola University at an area committee seminar. Seth spoke about his career in nonprofits, the ins and outs of working with boards, and the importance of an effective fundraising strategy.

Friends of AlumniCorps who tuned in to CBS’s 60 Minutes on January 7 may have heard a familiar voice: Former Project 55 Fellow Chris Mallette ’93 spoke about how police and communities in Chicago are working together with a unique program relying on science and the human touch to curb the city’s infamous murder rate. Learn more about Chris’s feature on the 60 Minutes CBS News website.


New Jersey

March 10, 2018. Tom Magnus ’77, Mercy Salaz Byrne ’83, Tim Byrne ’83, Justine Hamilton ’17, Harold Cotton-Max ’91 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Schuyler Softy ’11, Marcos Vigil ’97 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Aaron Buchman ’08, Margarita Rosa ’74, Marsha Rosenthal ’76, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17, Michael Buchman ’73, Kevin Reich ’00.

On March 10 the New Jersey Area Committee hosted a seminar on “How to Stay Involved in Nonprofit Organizations” featuring a morning keynote by former AlumniCorps board member Margarita Rosa ’74, and a panel on “Life After the Fellowship” moderated by Aaron Buchman ’08. Panelists were Lauren Peccoralo ’01, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Kevin Reich ’00, Schuyler Softy ’11. Paul Nehring ’10 served as discussant.

Margarita Rosa ’74 gave the morning keynote at the NJ Area Committee’s 3/10/18 event.

About 30 people came out to the day’s events, held at AlumniCorps’ offices at 12 Stockton Street, Princeton. Pictured, from left to right: Tom Magnus ’77, Mercy Salaz Byrne ’83, Tim Byrne ’83, Justine Hamilton ’17, Harold Cotton-Max ’91 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Schuyler Softy ’11, Marcos Vigil ’97 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Aaron Buchman ’08, Margarita Rosa ’74, Marsha Rosenthal ’76, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17, Michael Buchman ’73, Kevin Reich ’00.

 

 

 


New York

Attendees at the NY Steering Committee’s 4/10/18 meeting: Amy Olivero ’13 (board member), Scott Taylor ’75, Judy Surratt s’55 (board member), Moriah Akers ’14, Andrew Protain ’08 (board member), Kef, Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Maria Katarina Rafael ’15, Andrew Goldstein ’06, Molly O’Neill ’14. Taking the picture: Olympia Moy ’05.

On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 the New York Steering Committee met to plan activities and seminars for the incoming cohort of Project 55 Fellows. They were joined by AlumniCorps President & Executive Director Kef Kasdin ’85. Attendees included Amy Olivero ’13 (board member), Scott Taylor ’75, Judy Surratt s’55 (board member), Moriah Akers ’14, Andrew Protain ’08 (board member), Kef, Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Maria Katarina Rafael ’15, Andrew Goldstein ’06, Molly O’Neill ’14. Taking the picture: Olympia Moy ’05.


Washington, DC

The Washington, DC Area Committee hosted a seminar on the State of Public Education in DC. Attendees included two current Fellows—Furman Haynes ’17 and Tess Bissell ’17— a past Fellow—Joelle Deleveaux ’16— and Clara Botstein ’07. The event was held at CityBridge Education’s offices at the Watergate in DC. Attendees heard from Catharine Bellinger ’15 (pictured left) of Democrats for Educations Reform (DFER) DC and Maggie Bello (pictured right), Chief Academic Officer of Two Rivers Public Charter School.

Emerging Leaders Profile: An update on May Mark, EL ’14 – ’15

May Mark, Emerging Leaders alumna
May Mark, Emerging Leaders alumna from the 2015 cohort in NYC

Two years ago we profiled May Mark, an alumna of the ’14 – ’15 Emerging Leaders cohort in NYC. May had just relocated to the Bay Area from New York City. When May decided to move on from the tech startup that she joined, she turned to the AlumniCorps network to help her learn more about opportunities in the Bay Area.

May enrolled in Duke University’s intensive 17-month Cross Continent MBA program and she found that the degree complemented the skills she had acquired in Emerging Leaders. “EL helped me to focus on who I am as a leader and how I see myself in the context of others. It was a very safe space with a master facilitator and many opportunities to practice what we were learning… I had already done self-reflection, so I had a strong sense of who I was and where I need to grow.” Like many Emerging Leaders alumni, May credits her program facilitator in NYC with the program’s success: “Yael was an amazing facilitator. I spend a lot of time in the professional development space for adult learning and she’s definitely masterful at what she does.”

Thanks to the global MBA program, May now has classmates around the world. Because of her MBA cohort and other communities May is part of, she says, “I feel very comfortable reaching out to others in a new environment.” Thus, it comes as no surprise that when May got an email from AlumniCorps describing the vibrant Bay Area Steering Committee, she reached out to Steering Committee member Julie Rubinger Doupé ’09. “This new AlumniCorps community was an extension of the one I’d joined in NYC during the Emerging Leaders program. Even though the Bay Area is different, both communities have shared values.”

May (front, left) facilitating the "Managing Up" seminar
May (front, left) facilitating the “Managing Up” seminar for Project 55 Fellows in the Bay Area in December 2017.

Indeed, the Bay Area Steering Committee wasted no time in asking May to lead a seminar that December on Managing Up (see photo). She taught Fellows how to be proactive with their managers by using tactics like anticipating managers’ needs and being crystal clear with deliverables. “I really enjoy working with adult learners. My seminar included brainstorming, role-playing, and lots of discussion.” The experience differed from sessions with Emerging Leaders because the Fellows are much earlier in their careers. “The way I crafted the seminar was definitely informed by my reflections on my early work experience. I wish someone would have shared this information with me when I first entered the workforce!”

“I started to proactively build out my network, and Julie really helped me get to know people in the Bay Area.” May was able to secure a position as the Deputy School Support Lead at XQ, an organization that sparked a cultural conversation last fall to rethink high school nationwide. The organization began with XQ: The Super School Project, a competition inviting America to reimagine high school. Currently, May is focused on cultivating communities of practice among the XQ Schools, methodically encouraging school leaders and teachers to connect and learn from each other.

As May finishes her first year at XQ, the current cohort of Emerging Leaders participants are getting ready for their final sessions and closing celebrations. She reflects, “I didn’t see the Emerging Leaders Closing Celebration as the end of my experience… it was the start. I’d encourage the current cohort to continue to take the content you’ve learned and work with it… use it to reach out to others.” We’re happy to report that Project 55 Fellows in the Bay Area are benefiting from May taking her own advice.

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Emerging Leaders Learn from Seasoned Nonprofit Professionals – Winter 2018

The Emerging Leaders program is designed to help aspiring leaders in the nonprofit and public sectors develop the leadership capabilities, management skills, and confidence to advance their professional contributions and accelerate their careers. Emerging Leaders is currently offered in New York City and Washington, DC. The program is designed to accommodate those with full-time jobs and requires employer cooperation as well. The program runs for a total of eight full-day, monthly sessions from June-February (skipping August). All sessions are held on weekdays in each city. Fees for the program are based on the budget size of the applicant’s organizational budget.

You can learn more about the program and start an application here. The application deadline is March 12th, 2018. Please contact Caryn Tomljanovich, Director of Programs and Strategy at ctomljanovich@alumnicorps.org

In Washington, DC (pictured above, left to right):

  • In November Amber Romine, an executive coach and leadership development consultant, coached participants on presentation skill-building and practice. The session also covered emotional agility, networking, and learning conversations.
  • In December Amy Nakamoto, Senior Director, Corporate Education Partnerships at Discovery Education, spoke about executive perspectives on nonprofit financial management. Amy has spent her career working in education, nonprofits, fundraising, and youth development.
  • In January, James Siegal, President of KaBOOM!, joined Alex MooreDC Central Kitchen’s Chief Development Officer, to speak about inter-organizational collaboration.

In New York City (pictured above, left to right):

  • In November Andrew Nurkin, Deputy Director for Enrichment and Civic Engagement at the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation and former AlumniCorps Executive Director, spoke about storytelling and public speaking.
  • In December Joan Carty, President and CEO of the Housing Development Fund in Stamford, CT spoke about non-profit financial management.
  • In January Peter Daneker ’95 Board Vice Chairman of DREAM Charter School (formerly Harlem RBI), and Laurie Williams, Executive Director of Reach Out and Read spoke about board/staff and executive director/chair roles and relationships.

    Peter Daneker ’95 Board Vice Chairman of Harlem RBI, and Laurie Williams, Executive Director of Reach Out and Read (both at the head of the table) spoke to the NYC cohort in January 2018.