Development Update

A Case for Giving

Princeton AlumniCorps is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. As such, we rely on the generosity of our donors, who provide nearly 80% of our operating budget. Our programs in Boston, Chicago, New York, Philadelphia, San Francisco, New Jersey, and Washington DC, provide mentorship, training, and professional development to approximately 80 talented passionate university graduates and nonprofit professionals who in turn, directly affect thousands of people served by our partner organizations. Your contribution helps assure that leaders at nonprofits across the spectrum from the arts, community development, and social justice, to education and the environment will continue to learn the skills they need to be effective agents of social change.

The IRA Charitable Rollover /Minimum Distribution Requirements

If you are at least aged 70½, you may be eligible to make a gift to Princeton AlumniCorps directly from your IRA.

Please note:

  • An IRA donation must be transferred directly from your IRA to Princeton AlumniCorps.
  • There is no subsequent tax deduction.
  • The distribution does not enter your income calculation, and thus, no tax is due.
  • Gifts may be made up to a maximum of  $100,000 per year.

Keystone Society Breakfast attendees in February 2016

The Keystone Society is comprised of a select group of donors who have chosen to assure the long-term health and sustainability of Princeton AlumniCorps by including AlumniCorps in their estate planning. Society members know that the
assets they commit now will continue to aid AlumniCorps for generations to come, as it develops civic leaders, builds an expansive a community, and creates social impact.

Keystone Breakfast 2017 speaker, Douglas Rushkoff ’83

Keystone Society members are honored each year with a small gathering featuring noted speakers. Past guests have included Nobel Prize-winner Professor Angus Deaton and noted first-amendment authority, Professor Margaret ‘Peggy’ Russell. Our 2017 speaker is noted author and media theorist Douglas Rushkoff ’83. This year, we welcome Lewis Miller ’49Judith Hole Suratt s’55, and J. Rogers Woolston ’55 as our new Society members. Thank you for your pledge of support!

For more information on how you can ensure your legacy with AlumniCorps, please visit the Keystone website.

New Staff at 12 Stockton!

Lorraine Goodman’83, our new Development Officer

Lorraine Goodman ’83 joined AlumniCorps in November 2016 as Development Officer. Since graduating from Princeton, she has been involved with Princeton Annual Giving, served as the Director of Development and Alumni Communications for the Friends of Theatre Intime, and was recently named Co-Chair of Princeton Women’s Network of NYC.

Her professional fundraising experience includes two years working for The Red Hot Organization, which produces record albums and then donates the proceeds to AIDS-related charities. Subsequent development positions included Corporate Membership Manager at the Paley Center for Media, Grants Manager at Theatre for a New Audience, and Director of Development at both The New York Musical Festival and Roulette Intermedium.

Lorraine also has a wealth of volunteer experience with organizations ranging from Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids, InTouch Radio Network for the Blind and Visually Impaired, and Hearts & Voices. Prior to her career in fundraising, Lorraine appeared on Broadway and overseas in first class productions of Cats, Phantom of the Opera, Master Class, Les Miserables, The Mystery of Edwin Drood, and more. Goodman has a Masters of Arts Administration from NYU’s Steinhardt.

Emerging Leaders Learn from Seasoned Nonprofit Professionals

The AlumniCorps Emerging Leaders program transforms talented nonprofit professionals into the next generation of public interest leaders. The program meets the critical need for highly skilled leadership in the nonprofit sector.

According to The Bridgespan Group, surveys consistently show that nonprofit organizations are acutely aware of their leadership development gaps, but unsure about how to address them. The Emerging Leaders program was conceptualized to address this public sector issue. The program runs for a total of eight full-day, monthly sessions from June-February (skipping August), and is made possible by a lead grant from American Express.

One of the hallmarks of the Emerging Leaders (EL) program is the high caliber of guest speakers that engage and educate participants.

New York City:

  • In November 2016, Jezra Kaye, President of Speak Up for Success coached participants on presentation skill-building and practice.
  • In December 2016, Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Director of Operations at Education Through Music, spoke about Nonprofit Financial Management & Reporting. AlumniCorps Executive Director Andrew Nurkin also spoke about Inter-Organizational Collaboration.
  • In January 2017, participants heard AlumniCorps Board Chair Liz Duffy ’88, President of International Schools Services, and Peter Daneker ’95, Board Vice Chairman of Harlem RBI, speak about Embracing Board/Staff and Executive Director/Chair Roles and Relationships.

Washington, DC:

  • In November Amber Romine, an executive coach and leadership development consultant, coached participants on presentation skill-building and practice.
  • In December Amy Nakamoto, Program Officer at the Meyer Foundation, spoke about Executive Perspectives on Nonprofit Financial Management. Amy has spent her career working in education, nonprofits, fundraising, and youth development.
  • In January, James Siegal, President of KaBOOM, joined Alex Moore, DC Central Kitchen’s Director of Development and Communications to speak about Inter-organizational Collaboration.
Applications are due Wednesday, March 8, 2017. Learn more and apply online here.

NJ Area Committee to give a Sneak Peak at the future of AlumniCorps!

The AlumniCorps NJ Area Committee is hosting a free gathering on February 2 from 7:00 to 10:00pm. The event will be held at the residence of an area committee member in the Rec Room (5th Floor) in Building Atlantic, 31 River Court, Jersey City, NJ 07310. This is just minutes from the Newport PATH Station. Wine, cheese, crudites and finger food will be served. Attendees will hear from Kef Kasdin ’85, President of AlumniCorps.

  • Learn about the new strategic vision for AlumniCorps
  • Share your expertise as mentors for social entrepreneur opportunities
  • Network with Project 55 alumni and AlumniCorps supporters, including current Project 55 fellows and alumni; Emerging Leaders; ARC Innovators; Princeton alumni; and AlumniCorps friends;
  • Meet the 2016-17 New Jersey Project 55 Fellows!

We’ll be joined by our current NJ PP55 Fellows (pictured below):

  • Sahana Jayaraman, University of Pennsylvania, School of Medicine
  • Kelsey Kane-Ritsch, D&R Greenway Land Trust
  • Aliisa Lee, International Schools Services
  • Maya Wahrman, Princeton University, Office of Religious Life


About Kef Kasdin ’85:

Kef Kasdin '85
Kef Kasdin ’85, Lecturer in Entrepreneurship at the Keller Center at Princeton and Rachel’s Network Board Chair

Kef Kasdin is President of Princeton AlumniCorps. Prior to assuming this role in June 2016, Kef created and grew AlumniCorps’ ARC Innovators program, which matches experienced professionals with impactful pro bono projects in the social sector, inspiring participants toward encore careers. Kef herself has made that transition. Kef teaches the introductory “Foundations of Entrepreneurship” course at Princeton University, where she inspires and mentors Princeton undergraduates to pursue social entrepreneurship pathways. She is also Board Chair at Rachel’s Network, a vibrant community of women at the intersection of environmental advocacy, philanthropy and women’s leadership with a mission to promote women as agents of change dedicated to the stewardship of the earth. Kef received her BSE degree from Princeton University in 1985 in Operations Research, with a certificate in Science and Policy from the Woodrow Wilson School; and an MBA from Stanford’s Graduate School of Business in 1989. Earlier in her career she held senior leadership roles at 3Com Corporation, including general manager of a $1B division; and was a founding General Partner of Battelle Ventures where from 2003 to 2015 she led the firm’s investments in clean energy and started several companies based on Department of Energy Lab technologies.


About the New Jersey Area Committee:
We support the Project 55 fellows who are placed in New Jersey, with area alumni mentors and networking/training opportunities. We also support the ARC Innovators program in New Jersey. We help identify nonprofit partner organizations to work with our Fellows, Innovators, and Emerging Leaders.

Marsha Rosenthal ’76 and Tom Magnus ’77 K55 chair the New Jersey Committee, which also includes Rick Ober ’65, Julia Otis ’91, and Haoqian Chen ’08.

Thank you so much for your interest and enthusiasm. Please join us. Many hands make light work, and we hope to have fun together.


About Princeton AlumniCorps:
Princeton AlumniCorps engages alumni at every age. Our year-long Princeton Project 55 Fellowships are for graduating Princeton seniors and other recent graduates. Emerging Leaders is a professional development program for nonprofit managers a little bit further along in their careers; the program is open to alumni of other institutions. ARC Innovators is for seasoned alumni with skills to offer; Innovators have ranged in age from 22 to 82; anyone in the wider Princeton network is welcome. Our volunteers are Princeton alumni of all ages, who serve as mentors, advisors, area committee members, Board members, seminar speakers, and more.

Thank you to our 2016 donors!


via GIPHY (PP55 2016-17 Fellows at orientation)

We are jumping for joy because of your generosity!
Thank you to the following donors who made gifts between January 1, 2016 and January 1, 2017! Our fiscal year ends June 30, so if you don’t see your name on this list, start 2017 by making your annual donation now!

Alina Abazova
Alexandra Abington
Diane Adachi
Arziki Adamu
Robert S. Adelstein ’55
Jessica Aisenbrey ’05
Moriah Akers ’14
Bridget A. Akinc ’98
Karen Ali ’78
Thomas D. Allison, Jr. ’66
Ari G. Altman ’97
Aitalohi Amaize ’07
William Ames ’55
Robert M. Amick ’55 & Carol R. J. Amick
Helen H. Amick ’87
Janna Z. Andrews ’96
Nicholas Apostolakis ’55
Jacob P. Arechiga ’05
Kimberly Atkins
Joseph Atkinson ’87
Kathryn T. Bailey ’10
Holly Bamford ’93
Christina Barba ’02
Hollis Barber ’11
Sarah Barbrow ’05
Lew Barker ’55
Jayne W. Barnard S55
Lauren W. Barnett ’92
C. Scott Bartlett ’55
Bishop George Bashore ’55 and Carolyn Bashore
John T. Beaty Jr. ’66
Ry Beck
Joel Bell
Lisa Bennett ’05
Ann D. Berkowitz
Sloan Bermann ’02
David W. Bianchi ’55
Katie Bisbee
Kirsten J. Hund Blair ’84 and William M. Blair *84
Brenda Blazer & Tom Nehring p’10
William Blinder ’98
Linda Boachie-Ansah ’02
Michael Boisvert ’84
Art Bond ’55
Justin S. Borntraeger ’02
Thomas D. Boyatt ’55
Stephen M. Boyd ’55 & Susan F. Boyd
Christopher Boyd ’87 k’55
Markley H. Boyer ’55 & Barbara Millen Boyer
Jennifer L. Carpenter ’96
John D. Bredehoeft ’55
Courtney E. Brein ’08
F. D. Brigham Jr. ’55
Elizabeth Q. Brown
Jessica Ginter Brubaker ’98
Abbey Bruce
Rachel Buckle ’13
Aaron Buchman ’08
Marci Buehler
Marshall M. Burkes ’98
Judith and William Burks Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation
Hugh Burns ’88 K55
Margerie Cadet
Yasmine Cadet
Eddy Cadet
Kevin Cahill
Elizabeth W. Cain Clark ’93
Katherine S. Canning ’97
Edie Canter ’80
Andrew G. Carey Jr. ’55 & Alison F. Carey
Douglas M. Carpenter ’55
James R. Carter, M.D. ’55
Sharon Carver ’82 K55
Warren Cathcart
David Chandler ’80 and Mrs. Liz Chandler
Christine D. Chang ’04 and Sid Gupta
Susan Chavez
Doyle Chedick
Haoqian Chen ’08 s’08
Lisly J. Chéry ’03
May Cheung
Christina Chica ’15
Cynthia M. Chin ’93
Edwin M. Clayton ’55
Philip Clippinger
Bridget Coburn
Caroline Coburn
Charles W. Coker Jr. ’55
Laura Collins ’99
Mary & Frank Condella p’12
Anna Condella ’12
Cristina Ritchie Cooper ’96
Lizanne Cox and David Gibson p’14
Frank T. Crews Jr. ’55
Anastasia Crosswhite ’94
Margaret M. Crotty ’94 & Rory Riggs
Schuyler Cunningham
Jennifer Daniels ’93
Bernard J. D’Avella Jr. ’66
D. K. Davidson ’55
Donna J. Dean h’55
Rebecca Deaton ’91
George C. Denniston ’55
Meredith Desautels ’04
Andres D. Diamond-Ortiz ’05
David Dieck ’78
Richard E. Dillon ’55
Elan DiMaio ’07
Kerry E. Dinneen ’77
Anna Doherty
Shannon Simmons ’03
James E. Douglas Jr. ’55
Lily Downing
Elizabeth A. Duffy ’88 & John A. Gutman ’83
William Dutton ’76
Sherry Edwards
Laura Elbogen ’07
Ryan Elliott ’14
Alexis Etow ’07
Jonathan Extein ’10
Matthew S. Ferguson ’96 & Kelli K. Garcia ’96
Lindsay L. Warner Ferrer ’01
Rodney J. Ferris ’55
James A. Floyd ’69, Ph.D.
Michelle Arader ’10
Elizabeth Frank ’81
Tim Freeth ’95 and Stephanie Freeth ’97
Maria Fregoso
Charles Freyer ’69
Dexter Frye ’80 k’55
Richard A. Frye ’55
David H. Fulmer ’55
Shie Gabbai
Marat and Farida Gabdrakhmanov p’16
Gary and Monroe Galloway P11
Andrew Garland ’01 & Anne Gordon ’01
David & Deborah Garr P06
Garrett James
Mr. George Gati and Mrs. Leona Brenner-Gati ’75
Paul Gazzerro III ’92
Austin H. George ’55
Jeremy M. Getson ’94 & Lisa B. Getson ’93
Molly Gibson ’14
Roger Gilbert Jr. ’55 & Marion M. Gilbert
Naomi Gilens ’11
Phillip E. Gladfelter ’55
Sarah Gladstone ’93
Steven L. Glauberman ’73
Anne Goldstein ’79
Byron Goldstein & Deborah Dolnick P06
Andrew Goldstein ’06
A. R. Gordon ’55
Alix M. Greenwald ’10
James A. Gregoire ’69 & Jane K. Gregoire
Dunrie A. Greiling ’92
William Grubbs
Cindy Guo
George C. S. Hackl ’55 & Ann W. Hackl
John D. Hamilton Jr. ’55
Stephen Hamilton ’73
C. R. “Bud” Harper ’55
Timothy Harr ’72
John R. Hastings ’55
Clark C. Havighurst ’55
Peter P. Hawryluk ’55 & Ann M. Hawryluk
Anne Hedeman ’74 and John Hedeman ’72 p’11
Donald C. Hellmann ’55
Sarah E. Hendricks ’00
Bernard H. Hendrix ’55
Carol H. Henn S55
Darlington P. Hicks ’94
Bob Hiden ’55
Robert L. Hill ’55
Herbert B. Hilty ’55
Albert P. Hinckley Jr. ’55
Scott Hindman ’03
Holly Holzer Bass ’92
Elizabeth Hoover
Madeline Hopper
Maggie Horikawa
Felix Huang ’07
David Huebner ’82
Kirsten O. Hull ’99
Daniel Hyman
Addison E. Igleheart ’55 & Deborah Igleheart
Leonard H. Inker ’55
Jake Jackson ’14
Jessica Jardine ’10
Desmond Jardine
Peter Jefferys ’55
James C. Jehle ’55
Hilary W. Joel ’85
John G. Johnson ’72
Timothy B. Johnson ’73 P12
Allen S. Johnson ’55
Jessica D. Johnson ’98
Landon Y. Jones, Jr. ’66 & Sarah B. Jones
William A. Jordan Jr. ’95
Thomas S. Jordan ’55
Brandon Joseph ’12
Eliana Kandel
C J Karalakulasingam ’98
Kef Kasdin ’85 & Jeremy Kasdin ’85
Julia Kassissieh
Stanley N. Katz h21 h80
Rebecca E. Kaufman ’11
Herbert J. Kaufmann ’55 and Nancy E. Kaufmann
Morgan Kazan
Benet J. Kearney ’05
Sharon Keld ’80
Dennis Keller ’63
Colleen Kelly ’77 s’77 p’10 p’14
Mr. James Kelly
Abigail Kelly ’15
Leslie P. Kernisan ’97
Robert J. Khoury ’90
Richard Kitto ’69 and Christine Kitto
H. Felix Kloman ’55
Katie E. Ko ’09
Dena R. Koren ’04
Marty Krasney ’67
Jaimie Krause
Greg Kuhns ’55 & Joan Kuhns
Debra Kushma ’80 s’79 p’13 k’55 and Michael Kushma ’79 s’80 p’13
Margaret Ladd
Anne G. LaLonde ’90
Jeremiah D. Lambert ’55 p’08 p’10 p*92
Houston E. Landis, III ’55
Shoshana M. Landow ’91
Joseph Laseter ’15
Stephanie Lauredent
William J. Lawlor ’56 & Blair S. Lawlor
Lisa F. Lazarus ’02
Kristopher Lazzaretti ’06
William R. Leahy Jr. ’66 & Christine M. Leahy
Sumin Lee ’09
Regina S. Lee ’85
Myron S. Lee ’55
Yeri Lee ’15
Annie Lee
Carolyn Lei
Mr. Thomas Levinson ’96
Mikaela Levons ’04
Scott D. Levy ’02
Aiala Levy ’07
Audrey Li ’13
Elizabeth Lindsey *07
Hilary J. Lipsitz ’55 & Ethel E. Lipsitz
Charity Lisko ’01
Robert B. Loveman ’69 and Gail J. Loveman
Courtney Lynch
James D. Lynn ’55
Eric Macey ’73
Thomas B. Magnus ’77
Robert F. Magnus ’55 and Claire S. Magnus
Dana Malman Warren ’03
Anne Z. Malone
Charles F. Mapes ’55 & Doris K. Mapes
Josephine Marescot
Luba Margai ’15
May Mark
Thomas Markham ’55
W. Jeffrey Marshall ’71 & Judith Smith
Karenna Martin ’15
Ed Mason ’55
Owen Mathieu ’66
Tessa Maurer ’13
Richard H. May ’55
Dana S. Mazo ’01
Jack McCarthy
Robert C. McClanahan Jr. ’55
Kate McCleery ’75 & Robert Martinez ’75
Wendy L. McGoodwin ’93
Ann E. McGowan ’92
Arthur McKee ’90 & Nancy E. McKee
Peter T. McKinney III ’55
Tiny McLaughlin
Sara McLean ’93
Trigg McLeod ’88
Steve ’55 and Kay McNamara
Edward R. McNicholas ’91
Cheryl McQueen ’77
Ricardo A. Mestres Jr. ’55
Dominic F. Michel ’70
Robert & Susan Michelotti
Lori Mihalich-Levin ’01
Peter T. Milano ’55 & Christine M. Milano
Tonya C. Miles ’82 and Harold Miles p’14
Kathryn A. Miller ’77
Oral O. Miller ’55
William W. Mills, Jr. ’55
Willis Mills ’55
Alliah Mohamed
Pamela G. Montgomery ’81
Helen J. Moran ’94
Paula J. Morency ’77 & Paul Dengel ’76
Kevin H. Moriarty ’99
Roland Morris ’55
Roger V. Moseley ’55
Peter D. Mott ’55
Frank F. Mountcastle Jr. ’55
Olympia Moy ’05
Amy Muehlbauer ’05
Amantia Muhedini ’15
Michael T. Mullaly ’04
Haaris Muneer
Rodrigo Munoz Rogers ’14
Mary P. Murley ’76 S72 P07 P10
Elizabeth E. Murphy Fitelson ’96
Gary B. Nash ’55
Paul Nehring ’10
David Nelson
Michael Nelson
Marianne Nelson
Christopher Nenno ’08
Richard & Mary Ella Nenno
Lee P. Neuwirth ’55 & Sydney Neuwirth
Rosemary Nidiry ’91
Erin E. Ebbel Niemasik ’06
Michael Noveck ’08
Ana Nunez
Andrew C. Nurkin
Justin J. Nyberg ’01
Ober Family Fund of the Princeton Area Community Foundation
Kate Reid ’04
Asha Y. Okorie ’00
Robin D. Olsen ’00
Charlene Huang Olson ’88
Allie Olson
Anna Maria Ortiz ’95
J. Rollin Otto Jr. ’55
Samuel Page ’10
Jerome F. Page & Katherine L. Frank P10
Audrey Pang ’05
Robert W. Parsons Jr. ’55
Anupama Pattabiraman ’10
Janet S. Paul S55
Arlene S. Pedovitch ’80 P11
Emily Penn ’77
Marta Perez
John T. Perkins ’55
Brian Perlmutter ’15
Tom ’85 and Trish Perlmutter ’85
Elizabeth Perriello Rice ’90 s’89 and Kenneth Rice ’89 s’90
Sara Peters ’11
Howard Piggee, III ’96
Allison Pink
James C. Pitney, Jr. ’71
Alan A. Platt ’65
Charles J. Plohn Jr. ’66 & Dorothy Plohn
Francis J. Pogan ’55
Daryl Pomylaka
Donald C. Pote ’55
Paul H. Potter ’55
Lionel & Valerie Protain P08
Andrew Protain ’08
William E. Pugh ’96 & Molly Pugh ’98
Kathy Qu ’13
Anthony C. E. Quainton ’55
Jospeh V. Quarles III ’55
Jennifer Radoff
Stephanie L. Ramos ’00
Elva Ray Herbruck S55
Stuart Raynor ’55
Julie M. Raynor-Gross ’75
Scott E. Regenbogen ’97
Kevin Reich ’00
Kathleen Reilly Streicher
Jonathan F. Remley ’95
Alan W. W. Reynolds ’11
Bill Richardson Jr. ’73
Antonio Riera, III ’00
Kelly Riling
Lois O. Robbins S’55, P’83, 85, 91, GP’10, K’28
Juli Robbins ’83 & Daniel Greenwald ’81 P10 K55
Jil Robbins Pollock ’85 K55
Gabriel Rodriguez
Judy Rogers
Alysa Rollock ’81
John P. Roos ’55
Jeffrey H. Rosalsky ’85 and Gail Shuttleworth ’86
Elizabeth C. Rosen ’10
Jessica Rosenbaum ’92
Bruce D. Rosenberg ’69
Ariela Rosenberg
Carol Rosenfeld ’05
Marsha Rosenthal ’76 & Michael Buchman
Stan N. Rubin ’55
William D. Ruckelshaus ’55 and Jill Ruckelshaus
Greg Ruffa and Lisa Gallagher p’16
Margaret Russell ’79
Nili Safavi ’01
Chet Safian ’55
L. Robert Safian and Mary Safian
Judy Safian and Brian Demers
Jennifer P. Safian S55
William J. Salman ’55
Michael Salmanson ’82
Troy Savage ’05
Barry Savits ’55
Nilan D. Schnure ’12
James M. Seabrook ’55
Elian Seidel
Andrew Seligsohn
Robert Sellery ’60
William C. Shafer ’55
Jeff Sharp ’80 & Liz Sharp
Mary Katherine Sheena ’04
Anne D. Sherwood ’92
Arti Sheth Thorne ’08 & Jack Thorne
Whitney A. Shinkle ’99
Robert M. Shoemaker ’55
Jim Sidford ’55
Robert B. Silverman ’55
Paul G. Sittenfeld ’69
Warner V. Slack ’55 & Carolyn P. Slack
Kristen N. Smith ’03
R. Justin Smith ’90
Kristofer L. Smith ’98
Caroline Smith
Zara Snapp
Schuyler L. Softy ’11
Awen Southern
Otto L. Spaeth ’55 & Ann B. Spaeth
Kathryn Spectorsky
Matthew Spurlock
Sitraka Andriamanantenasoa ’11
Adiella Stadler
Harrison I. Steans ’57
Sarah Stein ’97 & Michael Cohn
Stuart Steingold ’66
Heather R. Stephenson ’90
Richard P. Strickler ’55
Patrick A. Sullivan ’02
Caitlin Sullivan ’07
Judith Hole Suratt S55
Elizabeth Lees Taggart ’78
Robert R. Taliercio, Jr. ’90
Kejia Tang
Scott F. Taylor ’75 & Courtney F. Taylor
Jeanne Teutonico
Katie M. Thaeder ’09
Kate Therkelsen
Richard E. Thompson ’55
Paul Tibbits ’95
M. Jay Trees ’66
Andrew Trueblood ’05
Mrs. Kelly Trygstad
Tungare Manohar Family Foundation
Anna M. Varghese ’01
Kristin L. Vassallo ’97
Julienne Vinson
Richard O. Walker III ’73 & Deborah Walker
Lindsay M. Wall ’02 & Jeremy Wall ’02
Jack Wallace ’55
Shelly Ward
Elizabeth Warter, Ph.D. ’96
Christopher P. Watts ’99
R. Kenly Webster ’55
Camille Logan Weekes ’95
Lea A. Weems ’99 and Benjamin J. Porter ’98
Scott Welfel ’06
Henry Wendt III ’55
Jordan Wesley
Logan West ’07
John R. West ’55
Deborah K. Weyl ’06
Rebecca Garr Whitaker ’06
David G. White ’55
Juanita White
James R. Wiant ’55
Robert H. Wier ’55
Nelson H. Wild ’55
Alan M. Willemsen ’55
Richard H. Willis ’55
John P. Wilson ’55
John S. Wilson ’55
Richard W. Wilson ’55
Julie R. Wingerter ’92 & Seth Lieberman
Robert Wolk ’91
Richard C. Woodbridge ’65
Arthur P. Woolley ’55
Rogers Woolston ’55
Maia Wright ’00 & Kate Jarboe
Shelia Ann Wright
Artilie Wright ’06
Melissa H. Wu ’99
Amy Yang and Qi-Huang Zheng P15
Suzanne Yudell and Carl R. Yudell ’75
Sean Zielenbach ’90
Geraldine R.Dodge Foundation
Edward S. Moore Family Foundation
Jockers Family Foundation
Moskowitz Foundation
Irving and Sara Selis Foundation, Inc.
Harris Finch Foundation
’71 Legacy Initiative
American Express Foundation
Gelman, Rosenberg & Freedman
Collaborative Coaching
Longhouse Capital Advisors
Expedia Inc.
Blue Rose Capital Advisors, Inc
Wells Fargo Foundation
Anonymous (12 Donors)
Note: Several donors made multiple gifts

A Tale of Two Fellows

Bill Cummiskey ’05, Project 55 Fellow in 2006-07, and current teacher at The Community Group in Lawrence, MA

Bill Cummiskey ‘05, former PP55 Fellow & current teacher at The Community Group, holding his infant son.
Bill Cummiskey ‘05, former PP55 Fellow & current teacher at The Community Group, holding his infant son.

Why a Project 55 Fellowship?

After a year-long internship with group Athletes in Action, Bill applied to seminary.  Harvard Divinity School would have been ideal since his fiancé was enrolled in a PhD program at Harvard. But when he didn’t get accepted to the program, Bill found himself scrambling for a plan B. His friend, then-Executive Director Kim Hendler, encouraged him to apply for a Princeton Project 55 Fellowship at Community Day Public Charter School (now The Community Group) in Lawrence, MA.

 

How did a PP55 Fellowship morph into a teaching career?

In 2006, Bill’s Fellowship prompted him to start contemplating long-term career goals outside of vocational ministry. Bill reflects: “I started to really examine who I was and who I wanted to be.” He remembers driving back from apple picking at a farm near the school and having an epiphany about how much he enjoyed teaching at the school. “The staff gave me so much positive feedback and support, and I realized I could easily see myself developing a career as a teacher there. The realization was due in large part to the kids. Our students in Lawrence are truly amazing and being with them and working with them is a reward in and of itself.”

How was PP55 different from an internship?

I think that supportive community was the highlight. Dena Koren ’04 (my PP55 mentor) even helped me find a summer job! The Boston Area Committee was motivated and comprised of interested people who were there if you needed them.

What does your role at TCG look like now?

Bill accepted a permanent roll at TCG after his internship year, where he wore many hats. “I began as a generalist which was one part paraprofessional in the classroom with other teachers, one part in house substitute, and one part helper at odd jobs and small groups.”  Over the next five years Bill’s teaching skills improved and he took on the role of a co-teacher. “I’d be responsible for small groups on long-term or even year-long bases and worked mainly in math and English language arts.”  Bill’s morphing role allowed him to teach the same group of students for four straight years. “They were an amazing group and it was an awesome experience.” Bill currently serves as the 7th and 8th grade science teacher, while also filling the role of a technology integration coach, a job he finds both fun and challenging.

PP55 had an indelible impact on Bill’s decision to work at TCG long term. What started as a “good job,” evolved into even more than a career : “Working in schools, in particular charter schools in Massachusetts, and in Lawrence specifically, has become a vocational calling. I can’t communicate how large a role TCG has played in my life. I’ve been there for one third of my entire life at this point, which seems incredible. I’d have to say that the colleagues I’ve worked with, their professionalism and skill and care for students, has been a huge gift. And the students are why we are all there and they are wonderful, new every day, and it is an amazing privilege to be entrusted to teach them.”

Bill and his wife, Kristina Fontanez ‘05, live in MA with their two sons.


Nina Narayanan ’16, current Project 55 Fellow at The Community Group in Lawrence, MA

Nina Narayanan ’16 is currently a PP55 Fellow at The Community Group
Nina Narayanan ’16 is currently a PP55 Fellow at The Community Group

Why a Project 55 Fellowship?

I’m planning on pursuing a PhD in anthropology, but for me the choice to take a year off in between was a no-brainer. I study anthropology largely because the discipline is defined by intercultural communication and understanding; it’s a natural venue for social justice and for confronting the changing possibilities of a multicultural world. PP55 has offered me the opportunity to work hands-on with a disadvantaged community and to learn directly from them about the challenges they face. Lawrence is a gateway city for low-income Latin American immigrants, so the population I serve has very specific linguistic, socioeconomic and socio-emotional needs. As an academic, I want to make sure that my theoretical work has tangible results, and that I’m able to understand the practical implications and lived experiences of racial inequality and cultural integration before approaching these topics from an academic standpoint. In this regard, my year as a PP55 fellow has already been invaluable.

What’s your role at The Community Group (TCG)?

The culture at The Community Group and at Community Day Arlington Elementary School is all hands on deck, all the time. For me that’s meant that while my job description involves creating and translating mass communications home, running parent meetings and parent-teacher conferences, and teaching adult ESL by night, I’ve also found myself thrown into the classroom to teach second grade for two weeks when we were suddenly understaffed; I’ve worked in Operations, and gotten an in-depth look at the day-to-day mechanics of running a school; I’ve started a student choir with our after-school program, and found myself involved with efforts to expand our enrichment and artistic offerings; and through various communication initiatives I’ve been able to play a direct role in shaping our long-term plans for bridging the language and education gap with our community. I rarely walk into work knowing what my day will look like, and I am consistently handed the opportunity to make a very real difference in the lives of our children and families. Every day is defined by surprise, excitement, and inspiration.

How has the PP55 Fellowship impacted your future plans?

After my fellowship, I’ll be spending a year in Argentina as a Fulbright scholar, then returning to the states to pursue a PhD in Anthropology and Ethnomusicology. The PP55 Fellowship has impacted ,my research focus by challenging me to consider how my work can make a practical difference. I’ve always been interested in the ways minority and immigrant communities define and express their identities against mainstream American culture. More and more, I find myself approaching this topic from the question of language and education, confronted as I am every day with the challenges of translation, interpretation, and cultural difference in an institutional educational setting. I hope and intend on making sure that my research is poised to do real work towards addressing these social issues.


The Community Group

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Young students at TCG’s Community Day Charter Public School in Lawrence, MA

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In response to the  poverty, teen pregnancy, illegal drug use, and gang violence that has plagued Lawrence, MA since 1970, The Community Group (TCG) has been creating opportunities in Lawrence by managing a range of programs, including a network of early childhood and out-of-school time programs, a network of charter and district public schools, consulting and training programs, and a child care resource and referral program. AlumniCorps is proud to have placed 15 Project 55 Fellows at The Community Group since beginning our partnership in 2005. Learn more about them at www.thecommunitygroupinc.org!