Reunions 2018 Immigration Panel Speakers

June 1, 2:00pm – 3:30pm
In the Service of Humanity: Empowering Immigrant Communities (Panel)
Princeton Neuroscience Institute, Room A32.

Phillip Connor *10 is a senior researcher at Pew Research Center. He is an expert on international migration, immigrant integration and immigrant religion in the United States, Canada and Europe. Connor prepares reports on immigration and religion, consults with demographic and public opinion researchers at the Center on migration aspects of their work, and analyses data. Before joining Pew Research Center, Connor received his doctorate in sociology at Princeton University. He was the lead author of the Center’s reports Faith on the Move and Still in Limbo: About a Million Asylum Seekers Await Word on Whether They Can Call Europe Home. He is also the author of the book Immigrant Faith and has published several academic articles in leading migration and religion journals. His work has been featured in The Wall Street Journal, Time and the Economist.

 


Maribel Hernández Rivera, Esq. *10 is a long time immigrant rights advocate and an accomplished public interest lawyer. She has experience in direct services, project management, and policymaking. As head of the NYC Mayor’s Office of Immigrant Affairs’ Legal Initiatives, Maribel is responsible for managing and promoting innovative access to justice programs for immigrants including ActionNYC and NYCitizenship.  Maribel previously served as Supervising Attorney at Immigrant Justice Corps where she directly supervised Department of Justice Accredited Representatives as they helped low-income New Yorkers apply for immigration benefits. Maribel is also a former Fried Frank/ MALDEF fellow.  As a fellow, she represented individuals in immigration detention, submitted an amicus brief to the Supreme Court in support of the U.S. government in the Arizona v. United States case, and participated in a group advocating for the representation of people in immigration detention.  Maribel received her J.D. from New York University School of Law, her Masters in Public Affairs from the Woodrow Wilson School of Public and International Affairs at Princeton University, and her A.B. from Harvard University.  Upon law school graduation, Maribel served as law clerk to the Honorable Mary M. Schroeder in the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit.


José Quiñonez *98 is Mission Asset Fund’s (MAF) founding CEO.
Under his leadership, he quickly built MAF into an award-winning nonprofit with innovative nationwide models for integrating financially excluded, low-income communities into the financial mainstream. For his work, he was awarded the MacArthur ‘Genius’ Fellowship, the Ashoka Fellowship, and the Aspen Institute Fellowship. He also received the James Irvine Leadership Award and Princeton University’s WWS Distinguished Alumni Award, among others.
José is a visionary leader, highly regarded in the consumer finance field. Currently, he serves in Consumer Advisory Boards for the Federal Reserve Bank of SF, US Bank, Experian, and Capital One. In 2012, he was appointed by the Director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau as the inaugural Chair of the Consumer Advisory Board. Governor Brown enacted legislation recognizing MAF’s Lending Circles program, making California the first state to lift up credit building as a force for good.
José is a passionate advocate for social justice. He is a former Congressional legislative assistant, and a nonprofit lobbyist in Washington, D.C. where he advocated for federal policy change regarding immigration, hunger and welfare reform.
José graduated from the University of California at Davis, and Princeton University’s Woodrow Wilson School.


Maya Wahrman ’16 is the Program Assistant in Forced Migration at the Office of Religious Life (ORL) at Princeton University, where she co-designs and administrates the ORL’s Interfaith Program in Refugees and Forced Migration. Last year she served as the Communications Coordinator at ORL through a Princeton Project 55 Fellowship.

Through her fellowship, Maya co-curated the international interdisciplinary conference of over 300 participants, Seeking Refuge: Faith-Based Approaches to Forced Migration. She has now assisted the office in acquiring two grants to sustain their innovative interfaith refugee program. This year she organized a high-profile policy forum about the role of religion in domestic refugee integration, internships for Princeton undergraduates with refugee service and policy organizations, and a service-learning project with local Central American unaccompanied minors and Princeton history students. Maya has invested in local and national expertise in refugees and forced migration through her work, her Arabic and Spanish skills, and her personal commitments, serving as a volunteer to detained asylum-seekers in the Elizabeth Detention Center, a member of Interfaith-RISE (a resettlement network in Highland Park), and a volunteer with the Neighborhood Sanctuary Alliance. Maya also served this past year as a peer tutor to Syrian refugees participating in a Princeton online history course from a refugee camp in Northern Jordan, tutoring online with two on-site visits to the camp and undergoing intensive training around Higher Education in Emergencies.

Maya graduated in 2016 from the History Department at Princeton University, with certificates in Near Eastern Studies and Creative Writing. She has published several opinion pieces using history to advocate for just solutions to the refugee crisis and for asylum seekers in the US.


 

A Note from the President & Executive Director – Winter 2018

Princeton University in the winter

As a board member and volunteer in the Princeton area for the past several years, I had always looked forward to January and the opportunity to interview applicants for the Project 55 Fellowship. This year, I had the privilege of conducting the interviews as a staff member and it gave me a deeper appreciation not only for the countless hours the staff and our volunteer alumni interviewers spend reviewing applications materials and asking thought-provoking questions, but also for the potential impact of this, our flagship program, to transform the applicants and our partner organizations. As I marked the nine-month anniversary of assuming the Executive Director role, I told every applicant I interviewed that it is (still) one of my favorite parts of the job. This year we invited about 120 Princeton University seniors to interview for over 70 placements with many longstanding partner organizations as well as several new exciting opportunities. Students took time from their busy Reading Period and exam schedules to trek in the cold and snow to our office at 12 Stockton Street. Our staff is joined by AlumniCorps volunteers as we assess which placement might best fit each candidate’s skills, passions, career goals, and specific interests. The energy of these young people is palpable and contagious, not only in our interview rooms but throughout the office. In the midst of tumultuous domestic and international news, the earnest determination of these students gives us a sense of hope for the future.

One applicant I met with is a Dreamer who has already had a profound impact on her communities. Incredibly smart, caring, and capable, she is passionate about college access and is already an accomplished poet and artist. Another demonstrated great empathy and sensitivity while reflecting on the impacts of the Swim Team scandal last year and lit up when describing his thesis research. He met with successful asylum seekers to the US who are here because of persecutions for gender identity. We met a young woman determined to be a pediatrician who remained resilient and positive despite losing her mother to breast cancer while our applicant was a Princeton undergraduate. I spoke at length with another applicant about arts as cultural narrative, storytelling, and personal expression.  This brilliant senior from a family of educators believes strongly in the ability of theater to develop empathy. As I listened to the students share their passions and future plans, I was reminded of why we do what we do and why we seek to mobilize these soon-to-be-Princeton graduates for the public good.

AumniCorps ED Kef Kasdin ’85 (center, in blue with sunglasses) and other members of Rachel’s Network near the current Mexico-US border wall, November 2017.

I thrive on the personal interactions with our community and January was just the icing on the cake of a busy fall making connections in our network. In keeping with our Bold Idea Initiative’s focus on immigration issues, in November I traveled to the Mexico-US border with Rachel’s Network. As the Board Chair of Rachel’s Network, I liaised with grassroots leaders working for fairer outcomes for immigrant populations and safer, healthier environments for border communities. You can learn more about the trip on Rachel’s Network blog, here: https://rachelsnetwork.org/borderlandstrip.

In October I traveled to the Bay Area with our Director of Programs and Strategy, Caryn Tomljanovich. We met with current and prospective partner organizations, and the Area Committee hosted a get together with volunteers and Fellows in Oakland, CA at NewSchools Venture Fund.

As February approaches and our Fellowship candidates interview with the partner organizations to which we will have referred them, we switch focus to our Emerging Leaders program, which concludes with Closing Celebrations in New York City (February 13) and Washington, DC (February 15).  It’s amazing how time has flown since we selected these 32 high potential young managers last spring and kicked off the program in June.  The Closing Day and Celebration allows for reflection on and sharing of their experiences with each other, supervisors, family, and the broader AlumniCorps community, which welcomes them to continued learning, impact, and transformation. The Program builds capacity for these dedicated and self-aware leaders, both in themselves and for the nonprofits they are preparing to run.

Each opportunity to engage with our program participants and committed volunteers brings a renewed sense of purpose and energy to the work that we do at 12 Stockton. If you are reading this Shared Effort newsletter/ blog, then you are considered a part of the great ‘fishnet’ that is the AlumniCorps family. Here’s to another year of mobilizing people, organizations, and networks for the public good.

Development Update January 2018

The Endowment and our Keystone Society

Did you know that Princeton AlumniCorps has an endowment? Our endowment fund is professionally managed by TIAA, and had a market value of $1,470,584 on December 31, 2017. Each year, a portion (up to 4% maximum) of the fund is drawn on to support our current programs, with the balance reinvested to build for the organization’s future financial needs.

The endowment is funded by our supporters’ gifts of cash and appreciated securities, gifts from retirement accounts, and through important Keystone Society bequests of similar gifts and pledged life insurance.

A few of our Keystone members at the Keystone Breakfast in February 2017.

The Keystone Society is comprised of our most generous and forward-thinking donors, members who have committed to ensuring the stability and long-term health of Princeton AlumniCorps. They understand the power of a planned gift. They know that the assets they leave to AlumniCorps will continue to grow, mobilizing people, organizations, and networks for the public good for generations to come. In 2017, we welcomed Lewis Miller ’49, Judith Hole Suratt s’55, and J. Rogers Woolston ’55 as our new Society members. Thank you for your pledge of support! New members will be inducted this February at our Leadership Circle Breakfast.


J. Rogers Woolston ’55 was inducted into the Keystone Society at the February 2017 breakfast.

Leadership Circle Breakfast 2018

Each year Keystone Society members are honored with a small gathering featuring noted speakers. This year we are expanding the scope of the event by hosting a Leadership Circle Breakfast for all those who have demonstrated their commitment by giving significant time, talent, and treasure to AlumniCorps. Past guest speakers have included Nobel Prize-winner Professor Angus Deaton, noted first-amendment authority, Professor Margaret ‘Peggy’ Russell ’79, and last year we heard from well-known writer, documentarian, and media theorist Douglas Rushkoff ’83.

Leadership Circle Breakfast 2018 Speaker, Dan-el Padilla Peralta ’06

Our 2018 speaker is new AlumniCorps board member Dan-el Padilla Peralta ’06Dan-el is Assistant Professor of Classics at Princeton University. He is currently finishing his latest book entitled Divine institutions: religion and state formation in middle republican Rome. His 2015 memoir Undocumented: A Dominican Boy’s Odyssey from a Homeless Shelter to Ivy League received an Alex Award from the American Library Association.

For more information on how you can ensure your legacy with AlumniCorps, please visit the Keystone website.

The Princeton AlumniCorps Bold Idea

Back row (right to left): Bob Kettle (Connecticut Appleseed), Stephanie Beaugh (Louisiana Appleseed), Dee Flaherty (Appleseed Network), Annette LoVoi (Appleseed Network), Dan-el Padilla Peralta ’06 (Princeton University, Princeton AlumniCorps), Debra Erenberg (Consultant), Kef Kasdin ’85 (Princeton AlumniCorps), Renee Steinhagen *81 (New Jersey Appleseed), Caryn Tomljanovich (Princeton AlumniCorps), David Tipson ’96 (New York Appleseed), Christy Kane (Louisiana Appleseed).
Front row (right to left): Adriana Abizadeh (Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund), Rocío Villalobos (Texas Appleseed), John Heilner ’63 (Latin American Legal Defense and Education Fund), Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17 (Princeton AlumniCorps), Shaina Ward, Maru Cortazar (Mexico Appleseed), Malcolm Rich (Chicago Appleseed).

On October 16 and 17, Princeton AlumniCorps hosted a convening at Princeton University enabling dialogue and promoting action on immigration and refugee issues.  The meeting, a launch of AlumniCorps’ new Bold Idea initiative, funded by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, brought together nonprofit and public interest organizations, practitioners, academics, policymakers, and funders.

The agenda included presentations on the current federal landscape of immigration policy and the local impact of these policies on vulnerable communities and the direct service organizations that work with them. The convening also provided opportunities for the 29 participants to engage with one another and brainstorm potential avenues of collaboration. The discussions culminated in a series of immediate project priorities for further engagement, with the aim of consolidating the budding partnerships between the different attendees while expanding the circle of participation as the initiative moves forward.

As President and Executive Director of AlumniCorps Kef Kasdin noted, “This meeting and our Bold Idea represent the heart of what Princeton AlumniCorps is all about: mobilizing people, organizations, and networks for the public good. We are grateful that the Hewlett Foundation has catalyzed this effort through their generous support.”

Emerging from the most recent AlumniCorps strategic plan, the Bold Idea endeavors to leverage the resources, strengths, and experiences of AlumniCorps’ considerable network of 600 partner organizations, 200+ volunteers, and 2,000 program alumni to make a palpable impact on an issue of public interest. The Bold Idea concept was inspired partly by previous endeavors undertaken by AlumniCorps in its early years, like the Tuberculosis Initiative (1997-2002). This first iteration of the Bold Idea, with a focus on immigration, is a two-year pilot that will extend into 2019. AlumniCorps will use the network-building insights gleaned from this pilot to select a new Bold Idea topic every three years.

To bolster the collective impact of this initial pilot project, AlumniCorps has partnered with Appleseed, a network of public interest legal centers throughout the United States and Mexico with a successful track record of developing bi-partisan solutions to persistent and challenging social issues. “Our commitment to network building and collaboration strongly aligns with the mission of AlumniCorps” said Deirdre Flaherty, President of Appleseed, “We are excited to harness the power of our combined networks on this key and timely issue.”

 

Reunions Recap 2017

Reunions Panel on Moving the Needle:
Princeton AlumniCorps and Systemic Social Change

Reunions Panelists: Arthur McKee ’90, Director of Research, CityBridge Education; Sodiqa Williams ’05, VP External Affairs, Safer Foundation; James Burgess ’09, Executive Director and Co-Founder of OpenBiome

AlumniCorps hosted a panel discussion entitled Moving the Needle: Princeton AlumniCorps and Systemic Social Change on Friday, June 2 during the 2017 Princeton University Reunions weekend. The discussion was moderated by AlumniCorps’ Director of Programs and Strategy, Caryn Tomljanovich and it focused on three AlumniCorps partner organizations that work to create systemic social change through philanthropy, policy, and research. The panelists were Arthur McKee ’90, Director of Research, CityBridge Education; Sodiqa Williams ’05, VP External Affairs, Safer Foundation; and James Burgess ’09, Executive Director and Co-Founder of OpenBiome. They spoke about their organizations and the contributions AlumniCorps programs–especially Project 55 Fellows–have made to their work.

Panelists Sodiqa, Arthur, and James field questions from the audience.

James said that OpenBiome in Boston is lucky this year because many of their PP55 Fellows are staying at the organization. “By the end of the first year they’re really doing a lot.” He commented to a laughing audience, “The main problem with the Project 55 program is that they’re all really good at getting into medical school… We feel so lucky to be able to have these types of folks coming on.”

Sodiqa spoke about the impact that their Project 55 Fellow, Aswari Sodhi ’15, had on Chicago’s Safer Foundation’s efforts to support clients with criminal records and facilitate their re-entry into the workforce. When it comes to funding advocacy for those with arrested convictions, Sodiqa asserted:”We need to invest in people, not property.” Aswari was vital to helping the organization draft and defend legislation that enables re-entry in Illinois.

Arthur sang the praises of the eight Fellows that CityBridge has had in Washington, D.C. Former Project 55 Fellow, Caitlin Sullivan ’07, was in the audience and asked how a sense of civic duty and public service can be encouraged in students while they’re still enrolled at Princeton. This question sparked great dialogue between audience members and panelists.


Farewell to Andrew Nurkin: A Luncheon

About forty people attended a luncheon on June 2 during Princeton Reunions to say farewell to outgoing Executive Director, Andrew Nurkin. Andrew is now serving as the Deputy Director for Enrichment and Civic Engagement at the ‎Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation. See below for photos of the event!

2017-18 Princeton Project 55 Fellows

This year’s Project 55 Fellow placements are complete! We received 161 completed applications from students and recent alumni, and 47 Fellows have confirmed acceptance to the 2017-18 Program. We also have four continuing Fellows who are returning to their partner organization and wish to fully participate in the Fellowship program for a second year. Orientation was held for incoming Fellows on May 12, 2017; 34 Fellows were in attendance.

via GIPHY

Bay Area
Nickolas (Nick) Dreher ’17
UCSF

Hannah Kraus ’17
Aspire Public Schools

Kristina Phillpotts-Brown ’17
Greater Oakland Public Schools

Andrew Schilling ’17
UCSF

Boston
Audrey Abend ’17
OpenBiome

Cassandra (Cassie) Crifase ’17
Emergency Medicine Network at Massachusetts General Hospital

Kelly Hatfield ’17
The Community Group

Daniel Rounds ’17
The Community Group

Monica Seng ’17
OpenBiome

Chicago
Andrew Hahm ’17
Carole Robertson Center for Learning

Zena Kesselman ’17
Illinois State Board of Education

Michael Manning ’17
New Markets Support

Adjoa Mante ’17
Sinai Community Institute

Nora Niazian ’17
Center for Economic Progress

Briana Payton ’17
North Lawndale Employment Network

Marlyse Vieira ’17
Chicago Volunteer Legal Services

New Jersey

Justine Hamilton ’17
Princeton Internships in Civic Service, Princeton University

Trust Kupupika ’17
International Schools Services

Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17
Princeton AlumniCorps

New York

Akua Achampong ’17
New Community Corporation

Vivien Bazarko ’17
Reach Out and Read

Janine Cadet ’17
New Alternatives for Children

Julie Chen ’17
Brooklyn Defender Services

Eleanor (Ellie) DeGarmo ’17
New York Academy of Medicine

Veronica Edwards ’17
Readworks

Danielle Howell ’17
Coalition for Hispanic Family Services

Minji Kim ’17
Association to Benefit Children

Juliana (Julie) Lopez ’17
Coalition for Hispanic Family Services

Monica Magalhaes ’17
Vital HealthCare Capital

John (Jack) Marsh ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Colleen O’Gorman ’17
All In Together

Ashley Richards ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Piyapat (Poupae) Sinsub ’17
Housing Development Fund

Jenna Spitzer ’17
City Year

Hannah Srajer ’17
Association to Benefit Children

Alice Tao ’17
New York Center for Child Development

Durva Trivedi ’17
Rockefeller Foundation

Hannah Vester ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Gelila Yohannes ’17
New York Academy of Medicine

Washington, D.C.

Salwa Ahmad ’17
Aeras

Tess Bissell ’17
College Summit

Laurel Easterling ’17
Aeras

Richard (Furman) Haynes ’17
CityBridge Foundation

Alexandra (Lexi) Mairone ’17
Humanity United

Hayley Roth ’17
Partners for the Common Good

Anna Walker ’17
Partners for the Common Good