Regional Updates, Summer 2018

Bay Area

Project 55 Fellow Nick Dreher ’17 spent the past year at the UCSF Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center working on various clinical and epidemiological research projects. As a culmination of his year-long Fellowship, he was invited to present at one of the largest educational and scientific events in the oncology community. Read more about his experience, including several last-minute changes, on his blog post.

Project 55 Fellow Hannah Kraus ’17 has been working at Aspire Public Schools, one of the first public K-12 charter systems in the country. Her year has been an enormous learning experience with regards to education policy, nonprofit organizations, program design, survey administration, and equity/inclusion. She shares her learnings about evaluating teacher effectiveness and her experience at Aspire on her blog post.

Boston

Project 55 Fellow Monica Seng ’17 has been working to promote safe access to fecal transplants at OpenBiome. Her role as a Clinical Outreach Associate gives her the opportunity to support OpenBiome’s ever-growing clinical partner network to help treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection, which is the number one hospital-acquired infection in the country. Read more about Monica’s experience in her blog post here.

Chicago

On May 20, 2018, the Chicago Area Committee held a year-end event generously hosted by Vince Anderson ’65 and his wife. Project 55 Fellows, mentors, and Area Committee members shared the highs and lows of their time in Chicago.

New Jersey

On July 7, 2018, our New Jersey Area Committee welcomed the 2018-19 NJ cohort of Project 55 Fellows with a meet and greet at 12 Stockton

On July 7, 2018, our New Jersey Area Committee welcomed the 2018-19 NJ cohort of Project 55 Fellows with a meet and greet at 12 Stockton. Fellows, volunteers, mentors, and Area Committee members were able to enjoy some refreshments and great conversations about Princeton Project 55. See photos of the Fellows, mentors, and other volunteers here.

New York

On June 28, 2018, the New York Area Committee had a farewell party for the 2017-18 cohort of Project 55 Fellows in the city. The event took place at the home of AlumniCorps Board member and Area Committee member Judy Hole Suratt s’55. See lots of photos in the Facebook album here.

In April 2018, the Area Committee also gathered Fellows and volunteers at Seward Park NY Public Library on 4/28/18. They discussed the role of public libraries in modern times and got a tour of the Seward Park Branch of the New York Public Library. The group even got to peek in on a library program and some classes, then afterward they enjoyed some dim sum. See photos of their tour of the library here.

Piyapat “Poupae” Sinsub’ 17, Project 55 Fellow at the Housing Development Fund, wrote about her experience as a Development Assistant based in Stamford, CT. She shared how questions like “What can we do to make nonprofits operate as efficiently as corporates when there are not enough incentives?” led her to the discovery of social enterprises—a field she plans to pursue at the graduate level. Read more in her blog post.

Washington, D.C.

Furman Haynes ’17 just completed his Fellowship at CityBridge Education and has been hired to work full time at the organization with the former D.C. Deputy Mayor for Education, Jennie Niles, to create pathways for the city’s young people into STEM-related careers. Congratulations, Furman! Read about his experience as a Fellow there in his blog post. Former AlumniCorps Emerging Leader Brandon White ’09 has stepped up into leading the development of a great seminar series for the Project 55 Fellows in Washington, D.C. in the upcoming program year. Brandon also sat on one of our panels at Reunions 2018; see our Reunions update for details.

Emerging Leaders Update: Summer 2018

We now have the evaluation results from the 2017-18 cohort of Emerging Leaders that completed our professional development program this past February. 100% of the cohort would recommend the program to others, and they all agreed that the program increased their access to a community of peers that they can learn from and contact as needed. AlumniCorps will continue to offer alumni engagement opportunities to these “Emerged” Leaders through structured lunches hosted by our program facilitators, Hilary Joel ’85 and Yael Sivi. AlumniCorps staff are also working with the facilitators to develop and offer “Booster Shots” which will be full day professional development opportunities offered to over 200 Emerging Leaders alumni.

Meanwhile, our current 2018-19 cohort of 32 Emerging Leaders (ELs) in New York and Washington, DC are 25% through the program, having completed their June and July sessions.  Learn more about this cohort in The Leaders Digest program directory. The first session focused on the results of the participants’ Myers Briggs Type Indicator assessments. One EL in Washington, D.C. said, “My test was a manifestation of my recent struggle in my position and the resulting self-doubt I felt…now I see that I need to be operating with my [extroverted personality] in mind in order to re-charge, operate effectively, and bring the most to the organization.” In New York City, the cohort also heard from Princeton AlumniCorps’ President and Executive Director, Kef Kasdin ’85. One participant wrote, “Kef shared openly about her professional journey and about the importance of social intelligence and emotional intelligence in leadership.”

During the second session in July Emerging Leaders (ELs) debriefed their Skillscope 360 assessments, discussed how to cope with their stress patterns and instead play to their strengths, and heard from guest speakers. The New York City cohort heard from Cecilia Clarke, President & CEO, Brooklyn Community Foundation, and EL alumnus Chimere Stephens, Director of NYC Men Teach, a collaboration with the NYC Department of Education, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Young Men’s Initiative, and the City University of New York. ELs in Washington, D.C. heard from EL alumna Felicia Jones, Director of Healthy Start at Martha’s Table, and Kevin Hinton, Executive Director of Beacon House.

 

In Memoriam: Dr. Warner V. Slack ’55

Dear AlumniCorps Community,

We were deeply saddened to learn of the death of Dr. Warner V. Slack ’55, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and co-founder of the Division of Clinical Informatics, on June 23, 2018. Warner and his wife Carolyn Paxton Slack were great supporters of AlumniCorps; Warner served on AlumniCorps’ board for four terms spanning 1993 to 1999, and 2007 to 2013, and as recently as 2017 donated his time to mentor Fellows in the Boston area. Warner passed away at the age of 85 in Carolyn’s arms on the morning of their 62nd wedding anniversary after battling pulmonary fibrosis.

Warner was among the first physicians to envision the essential role that computers would play in medicine and healthcare delivery. His landmark work involving computer-patient interviews, begun during the 1960s, anticipating by decades the now-prevalent field of electronic medical records. He was a strong advocate for patient rights in what became HIPAA.  As his son, the author Charlie Slack wrote:

[Warner Slack’s] article “The Patient’s Right to Decide,” published in the British journal The Lancet, put forth a then-radical idea of “patient power”—encouraging patients and physicians alike to overturn the traditionally paternalistic nature of healthcare. Patients, Dr. Slack believed, should play a crucial part in determining their own care. Their insight, he often said, was “the least utilized resource in healthcare.’

A New Jersey native, Warner went on after Princeton to graduate from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1959. He served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force in the Philippines during the Vietnam War.  He later returned to the University of Wisconsin at Madison in the Departments of Medicine and Computer Science, where he had done his residency, and where he subsequently developed the first computer-based medical history system.  In 1970 he was recruited to Harvard. From 1989 to 1998 Dr. Slack was editor in chief of the journal MD Computing. Active in civil and humanitarian causes, Warner participated in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery Freedom March, was co-founder of Faculty and Students for Equality at University of Wisconsin, and even into his 70’s traveled to Honduras to provide humanitarian medical assistance.

 Warner V. Slack dry-erase board mural
A dry-erase board mural shared on the reflections site of the Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians Informatics Department, http://hmfpinformatics.org/slack/?show_all=true

Loved ones recall his warmth, optimism, gentleness, and generosity. He was happiest spending time with Carolyn and family at their cabin on Meddybemps Lake in Maine. A long-time Newton, MA resident, he was a trustee of Lasell College.

Warner’s classmates remember him as a warm-hearted and deeply effective leader of Princeton AlumniCorps, from its inception as Project 55 to his last days. His engagement and support ran the gamut – from assembling Fellowship mentors every year to organizing events in Boston to mentoring many Project 55 Fellows himself over the years. He also supported AlumniCorps’ mission with his time and thoughtful advice as a board member, and with his generous financial giving. As classmate George Hackl reflects, “In his self-effacing way Warner was the epitome of everything we strive to be at AlumniCorps.” On his website Ralph Nader ’55 recalls, “I called Dr. Slack to express my deepest admiration and said: ‘For all your adult life, Warner, you have been a physician’s physician, a patient’s physician, a student’s physician, a citizen’s physician, and a champion of peace and justice.’ “

In addition to his wife of 62 years, Dr. Slack is survived by daughters Alison and Jennifer, son Charlie, and seven grandchildren.

Why Support Princeton AlumniCorps?

Princeton AlumniCorps is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. As such, we rely on the generosity of donors like you, who provide more than 80% of our operating budget. With nearly three decades of experience working with nonprofits and other civic-minded organizations across the country, AlumniCorps leads the charge to develop talent, create networks, and nourish a pipeline of effective leaders in the nonprofit sector. Each year our programs in Boston, Chicago, New York, San Francisco, New Jersey, and Washington, DC provide mentorship, training, and professional development to almost 100 talented and passionate university graduates, Emerging Leaders, and ARC Innovators who directly affect thousands of people served by our partner organizations.

Your contribution ensures that the next generation of nonprofit leaders working in community development, social services, education, the environment, civic service, and more, can develop the skills and knowledge they need to effect long-term, systemic social change.


We’ve launched a special fundraising appeal focused on our Project 55 Fellowship & Internship alumni, with a target of $27,000 by June 30, 2018. To help inspire these program alumni, we shared photos of years gone by asking “Remember YOUR Princeton Project 55 experience?” In addition, current and continuing Fellow Anna Walker ’17 (pictured below), who is working at Partners for the Common Good in Washington, DC, wrote a heartfelt letter to the program alumni, outlining three reasons why she will always support the program.

Photo captions: (a) Anna (3rd from left) and her coworkers & PP55 Fellow Hayley Roth ’17 (right), at the Opportunity Finance Network Conference in Sept. 2017. (b) Anna with Hayley in the office. (c) Anna at training on the fundamentals of the opportunity finance industry hosted at Self-Help Credit Union.

First: No other university has a program like Project 55 (PP55). In all my conversations with recent graduates from other universities, I’ve found that only Princeton has a nonprofit fellowship program created and funded by alumni. I like to think that we Tigers are an exceptional bunch, and PP55 certainly cements that conviction.

Second: The support I received from Project 55 throughout the job search and application process. Instead of sending dozens of cover letters into the ether, never to be heard from again, I had PP55 staff, program alumni, and peers who could help me prepare for an interview, offer advice for placements, and even give a nudge to organizations I had interviewed with to improve my chances for a fulfilling post-graduate job. To have the guidance, reassurance, and support of PP55 staff and infrastructure during that process helped me and many other Fellows maintain our sanity.

Lastly: Former Fellows and Princeton alumni who welcomed me and the other Fellows into their homes and lives. Starting a new job in a new city with new people is difficult. Thanks to the PP55 network, a welcoming committee of local Princetonians awaits each PP55 Fellow. From backyard barbecues to cultural events to individual mentors, PP55 has connected me with fascinating people who have supported and guided me during my Fellowship. The best way I know to thank all those people who have welcomed the DC Fellowship class is to give my own time and expertise to future Fellows and the PP55 program.

Bold Idea Update

160 attend webinar on trauma and mental health in immigrant and refugee communities

As part of the Bold Idea initiative, Princeton AlumniCorps and Appleseed hosted a webinar presentation and Q & A on the topic of trauma and mental health in immigrant and refugee communities. One-hundred and sixty viewers from all over the United States tuned in to listen and learn from Dr. Usha Tummala-Narra and Dr. Maria Nardone about the various aspects of trauma, including the effects of the current political climate on mental wellness and the generational impact of chronic stress on immigrant families.

A girl holding a doll, arrives with others migrants at the refugee center in the town of Presevo, after walking from Macedonia to Serbia on August 26, 2015. At least 2,000 more migrants flooded overnight into Serbia in a desperate journey to try and go on to Hungary, the door into the European Union, a UN official said on August 24. More than 9,000 people, mostly Syrian refugees, have arrived to Serbia those last three days. AFP PHOTO / ARMEND NIMANI

The Bold Idea initiative seeks to bring together practitioners, academics, policymakers, and funders from both within and beyond the AlumniCorps network for dialogue and action over a three-year period. The current iteration of the Bold Idea is a two-year pilot focusing on immigration issues. AlumniCorps, in partnership with Appleseed, a network of 17 public interest centers in the United States and Mexico, received a grant from the Hewlett Foundation to promote network-based collaboration focused on the issues facing immigrants and refugees.

Get free access to the recorded webinar here. To learn more about empowering immigrant communities, come to our Princeton Reunions 2018 panel, In the Service of Humanity: Empowering Immigrant Communities on Friday, June 1 at 2:00pm in the Neuroscience Building. Get more details here.