Bold Idea Update: Webinar Convenes Thought-Leaders on Supporting Immigrant Students

 

Conceived as a way to both capitalize on and grow AlumniCorps’ extensive network of its program alumni and nonprofit partners, The Bold Idea started with a two-year pilot focused on immigration. Implemented in partnership with Appleseed – a network of public interest justice centers throughout the U.S. and Mexico – the initiative has attracted a variety of new partner organizations to our work. As a key aspect of this project, we have organized a series of webinars on specific topics of interest around immigration. The second webinar in the series was entitled Supporting Immigrant Students in Universities. It was held on September 27, 2018, and attracted 99 registrations and 45 participants to tune in live and engage with the speakers.

Yurilka Hernandez, Mariana Paola Sarmiento Hernández, and Ariana Mora Mero, guest speakers on the Bold Idea webinar.

Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17, AlumniCorps’ Bold Idea Fellow, now in his second year, found the featured guest speakers for the webinar by first leveraging our connection to Princeton University’s Khristina Gonzalez, Associate Dean of the College and Director of Programs for Access and Inclusion, and asking for suggestions. After some extensive research, he was referred to Mariana Paola Sarmiento Hernández (center), a graduate student at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and founder of the UndocuNetwork student organization; and Ariana Mora Mero (right), Program Coordinator, Services for Undocumented Students, at the University of California (UC), Merced. AlumniCorps had recently engaged Dr. Laura Quiros, Associate Professor at Adelphi University and consultant, to co-facilitate an Emerging Leaders professional development session on diversity, equity, and inclusion (see page 2 for details). Dr. Quiros recommended inviting Yurilka Hernandez (left)— a psychotherapist at the Acacia Network in New York City with over 10 years of experience in the areas of mental health, cultural competency, and immigrant families— to join the panel. Once again, AlumniCorps’ personally connected network catalyzed the convening of experts on a public issue.

Guest speaker Mariana Sarmiento shared a photo from a recent Undocuweek event with us: ‘UndocuFemme and Unafraid.’

The three guest speakers provided a wealth of resources: Yurilka shed light on the impact of deportation on children and young adults, including those protected under the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) policy. Mariana spoke about the process of institutionalizing resources for undocumented students in higher education, while Ariana spoke about the implementation of an orientation program for undocumented students at UC, Merced. A free recording of the webinar can be found on the AlumniCorps website or obtained by emailing our Bold Idea Fellow .

Fall 2018 Regional Updates

Bay Area

The Bay Area got off to a great start with an orientation and goal-setting reception on August 18. The committee took their seven Fellows to see a San Francisco Giants baseball game on September 11, 2018. Pictured are (left to right) Anu Pattabiraman ’10 (committee volunteer), Yash Huilgol ’18, Erin Lynch ’18, Natalie Larkin ’18, Mark Goldstein ’18, Martin Kurian ’18, Jonah Donnenfield ’18, Tiffany Lee ’11 (committee volunteer), and Michelle Arader Fort ’10 (committee chair). The committee also hosted a seminar on Managing Up on October 18, which received very positive feedback from the Fellows; a fellow from a similar program at Stanford joined them.


Boston

The Boston Area Committee kicked off the year with lunch and a swan boat ride on August 18. In the picture on the left, above, in the front row: Alice Tao ’17 (volunteer), Alice Frederick ’17, Minjia Tang ’18, Kelly Hatfield ’17 (volunteer), Heather Barnard Gruber ’96 (volunteer).

Back row: Rebecca Curtin (volunteer), Sitraka St. Michael ’11 (volunteer), Maranatha Teferi ’16, Jonathan Yu ’18, Caitlin Sullivan ’07 (volunteer), Liam Fitzgerald ’18, and Julia Perlmutter ’17.


Chicago

The Chicago Area Committee hosted a kick-off event on September 9. Front row: Carol Obertubbesing ‘73 (volunteer), Emily Pauls ‘18, Virginia Midkiff ‘16 (committee chair), Alice Mar-Abe ‘18, My Bui ‘18; mentors Kristen Molloy ’08, and Vince Anderson ’65; Chris Shin ‘18, Samantha DeKoven ‘94 (mentor), Sherry Holland (volunteer), Andrew Hahm ‘17 (recent Fellow).
Back row: Fiona Bell (friend of one of the Fellows), Ankush Rakhit ‘18, Courtney Wax ‘18, Kristen Smith ‘03 (mentor), Latalia White ‘13 (mentor/ committee member); committee members Rebecca Deaton ’91, Kirsten Hull ’99, and Stacy McAuliffe ’98; Michael Manning ’17 (recent Fellow), Nkosi Shangwa ’18, Ben Levenson ‘15 (mentor); and committee members Tom Allison ’66 and Nathalie Langerfeld ’09.

 

Committee member Lindsay Wall’s children, Callie and Ozzie Wall (above) also joined in the fun!

Special thanks to Carol Obertubbesing ‘73 for hosting the 2018-19 Fellows on the Chicago Architecture Foundation River Cruise on September 9, just before the kick-off event. Back row: Chris Shin ’18, Ben Levenson ‘15 (mentor), Ankush Rakhit ’18, and Nkosi Shangwa ’18. Front row: Courtney Wax ’18, Alice Mar-Abe ’18, Fiona Bell, and Emily Pauls ’18.


New Jersey

In July 2018, the New Jersey Area Committee got the year off to a great start with a meet and greet. Fellows got the chance to meet their mentors. Pictured above, front row: Norah Reich k’00, Kristen Epstein ’97, Rick Ober ’65, and Rosed Serrano ’18.
Middle: Michael Novek ‘08 and his daughter, Josie.

Back row: Jean Trujillo *95, Audrey Henry ’76, Tom Magnus ’77, Mercy Byrne ’83, Kevin Reich ’00 and his daughter Maeve, Marsha Rosenthal ’76, Jacobine Dru ’07, Anna Kapolka ’18, Ava Torjani ’18, Kabbas Azhar ’18, Kayla Moffett ’18, John Heilner ’64, and Bill Woodrow ’71.

Audrey Henry ’76 met with Kabbas Azhar ’18, her mentee.
Mercy Byrne ’83 chats with Anna Kapolka ’18.

New York

Project 55 Fellows enjoyed a kick-off event at Judy Hole Suratt s’55’s home on September 4. This year 20 Fellows will be working at 15 different partner organizations in New York City. Pictured, left to right: Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Edric Huang ’18, Maraiya S. Hakeem ’12, Scott Taylor ’75, Dominic Michel ’70, Rochelle Forni ’18, Kef Kasdin ’85, Carolyn Birbiglia ’11, Reinaldo Maristany IV ’18, Nitasha Siddique ’18, Katrina Davies ’18, Maia Craver ’18, Kelly McCabe ’18, and Aaron Sun ’18.

Attendees listen intently at the NY Area Committee kick-off event.

Washington, D.C.

In Washington, D.C. Clara Botstein ’07—Project 55 and Emerging Leader alumna—opened up her home to host the Area Committee’s kick-off event for the Fellows in September. On October 25, Meaghan Byrne ’10 and Alan Platt ’66 (pictured left) spoke about navigating career paths at a seminar held for the Fellows. Victoria Navarro ’18, current Fellow at PeerForward, is pictured on the right.

Emerging Leaders expands Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion session, and more!

The Emerging Leaders (EL) professional development program is designed to help aspiring nonprofit leaders develop the capabilities, skills, and confidence to advance their professional contributions and accelerate their careers. Currently, 32 young nonprofit professionals—16 in New York City (NYC) and 16 in Washington, D.C. (D.C.)— are more than halfway through the program.

In Session 2, the New York City cohort heard from Cecilia Clarke (back row, left), President & CEO of the Brooklyn Community Foundation, and EL alumnus Chimere Stephens (far left), Director of NYC Men Teach, a collaboration with the NYC Department of Education, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Young Men’s Initiative, and the City University of New York.

In June and July the sessions focused on the results of the participants’ Myers-Briggs Type Indicator and Skillscope 360 assessments. ELs also heard from several guest speakers, including EL alumna Felicia Jones, Director of Healthy Start at Martha’s Table.

ELs in Washington, D.C. heard from EL alumna Felicia Jones, Director of Healthy Start at Martha’s Table, and Kevin Hinton, Executive Director of Beacon House, with EL facilitator Hilary Joel ’85 at Session 2.

In September, session three was reconfigured for the 2018-19 cohort to focus on Leading For Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion (DEI). This year, our regular facilitators, Hilary Joel ’85 and Yael Sivi, were joined by co-facilitators, Dr. Laura Quiros, a DEI consultant and Associate Professor at Adelphi University in NYC, and Iris Jacob, Founder & CEO of Social Justice Synergy in D.C.

One NYC participant commented that the DEI session, “…raised some personal questions about what authentic leadership looks like for me…Hopefully, the outcome is a leadership style that feels rooted in who I am and allows me to be my whole self.” In D.C., a cohort member said, “Iris was great! It would be very easy for DEI to be treated superficially by organizations. Her facilitation and guidance gave us some meaningful ways to help make it a deeply transformative and intentional process.”

In October, the fourth EL session focused on management-related topics; guest speakers were Amy Nakamoto, Vice President, Discovery Education (D.C.) and David Garza, Executive Director, Henry Street Settlement (NYC).

David Garza, Executive Director, Henry Street Settlement, speaking at New York’s Session 4 on Management 101.

On November 1, 2018, NYC facilitator, Yael Sivi, hosted an EL alumni lunch for seven participants. After reading articles about the convergence of personal and professional growth, Yael led the group in a combination of large group discussion, pair work, and some peer coaching over the course of two hours. EL alumni in attendance were: Jess Weis, Liam Cates, Margie Cadet, Caroline Coburn, Julian Forde, David Nelson, and Andrew Protain ’08, who is a current AlumniCorps board member.

Learn more about our current cohort of Emerging Leaders by browsing their bios in The Leaders Digest participant directory, available online.

Regional Updates, Summer 2018

Bay Area

Project 55 Fellow Nick Dreher ’17 spent the past year at the UCSF Carol Franc Buck Breast Care Center working on various clinical and epidemiological research projects. As a culmination of his year-long Fellowship, he was invited to present at one of the largest educational and scientific events in the oncology community. Read more about his experience, including several last-minute changes, on his blog post.

Project 55 Fellow Hannah Kraus ’17 has been working at Aspire Public Schools, one of the first public K-12 charter systems in the country. Her year has been an enormous learning experience with regards to education policy, nonprofit organizations, program design, survey administration, and equity/inclusion. She shares her learnings about evaluating teacher effectiveness and her experience at Aspire on her blog post.

Boston

Project 55 Fellow Monica Seng ’17 has been working to promote safe access to fecal transplants at OpenBiome. Her role as a Clinical Outreach Associate gives her the opportunity to support OpenBiome’s ever-growing clinical partner network to help treat patients with recurrent Clostridium difficile (C. diff) infection, which is the number one hospital-acquired infection in the country. Read more about Monica’s experience in her blog post here.

Chicago

On May 20, 2018, the Chicago Area Committee held a year-end event generously hosted by Vince Anderson ’65 and his wife. Project 55 Fellows, mentors, and Area Committee members shared the highs and lows of their time in Chicago.

New Jersey

On July 7, 2018, our New Jersey Area Committee welcomed the 2018-19 NJ cohort of Project 55 Fellows with a meet and greet at 12 Stockton

On July 7, 2018, our New Jersey Area Committee welcomed the 2018-19 NJ cohort of Project 55 Fellows with a meet and greet at 12 Stockton. Fellows, volunteers, mentors, and Area Committee members were able to enjoy some refreshments and great conversations about Princeton Project 55. See photos of the Fellows, mentors, and other volunteers here.

New York

On June 28, 2018, the New York Area Committee had a farewell party for the 2017-18 cohort of Project 55 Fellows in the city. The event took place at the home of AlumniCorps Board member and Area Committee member Judy Hole Suratt s’55. See lots of photos in the Facebook album here.

In April 2018, the Area Committee also gathered Fellows and volunteers at Seward Park NY Public Library on 4/28/18. They discussed the role of public libraries in modern times and got a tour of the Seward Park Branch of the New York Public Library. The group even got to peek in on a library program and some classes, then afterward they enjoyed some dim sum. See photos of their tour of the library here.

Piyapat “Poupae” Sinsub’ 17, Project 55 Fellow at the Housing Development Fund, wrote about her experience as a Development Assistant based in Stamford, CT. She shared how questions like “What can we do to make nonprofits operate as efficiently as corporates when there are not enough incentives?” led her to the discovery of social enterprises—a field she plans to pursue at the graduate level. Read more in her blog post.

Washington, D.C.

Furman Haynes ’17 just completed his Fellowship at CityBridge Education and has been hired to work full time at the organization with the former D.C. Deputy Mayor for Education, Jennie Niles, to create pathways for the city’s young people into STEM-related careers. Congratulations, Furman! Read about his experience as a Fellow there in his blog post. Former AlumniCorps Emerging Leader Brandon White ’09 has stepped up into leading the development of a great seminar series for the Project 55 Fellows in Washington, D.C. in the upcoming program year. Brandon also sat on one of our panels at Reunions 2018; see our Reunions update for details.

Emerging Leaders Update: Summer 2018

We now have the evaluation results from the 2017-18 cohort of Emerging Leaders that completed our professional development program this past February. 100% of the cohort would recommend the program to others, and they all agreed that the program increased their access to a community of peers that they can learn from and contact as needed. AlumniCorps will continue to offer alumni engagement opportunities to these “Emerged” Leaders through structured lunches hosted by our program facilitators, Hilary Joel ’85 and Yael Sivi. AlumniCorps staff are also working with the facilitators to develop and offer “Booster Shots” which will be full day professional development opportunities offered to over 200 Emerging Leaders alumni.

Meanwhile, our current 2018-19 cohort of 32 Emerging Leaders (ELs) in New York and Washington, DC are 25% through the program, having completed their June and July sessions.  Learn more about this cohort in The Leaders Digest program directory. The first session focused on the results of the participants’ Myers Briggs Type Indicator assessments. One EL in Washington, D.C. said, “My test was a manifestation of my recent struggle in my position and the resulting self-doubt I felt…now I see that I need to be operating with my [extroverted personality] in mind in order to re-charge, operate effectively, and bring the most to the organization.” In New York City, the cohort also heard from Princeton AlumniCorps’ President and Executive Director, Kef Kasdin ’85. One participant wrote, “Kef shared openly about her professional journey and about the importance of social intelligence and emotional intelligence in leadership.”

During the second session in July Emerging Leaders (ELs) debriefed their Skillscope 360 assessments, discussed how to cope with their stress patterns and instead play to their strengths, and heard from guest speakers. The New York City cohort heard from Cecilia Clarke, President & CEO, Brooklyn Community Foundation, and EL alumnus Chimere Stephens, Director of NYC Men Teach, a collaboration with the NYC Department of Education, Mayor Bill de Blasio’s Young Men’s Initiative, and the City University of New York. ELs in Washington, D.C. heard from EL alumna Felicia Jones, Director of Healthy Start at Martha’s Table, and Kevin Hinton, Executive Director of Beacon House.

 

In Memoriam: Dr. Warner V. Slack ’55

Dear AlumniCorps Community,

We were deeply saddened to learn of the death of Dr. Warner V. Slack ’55, Professor of Medicine at Harvard Medical School and co-founder of the Division of Clinical Informatics, on June 23, 2018. Warner and his wife Carolyn Paxton Slack were great supporters of AlumniCorps; Warner served on AlumniCorps’ board for four terms spanning 1993 to 1999, and 2007 to 2013, and as recently as 2017 donated his time to mentor Fellows in the Boston area. Warner passed away at the age of 85 in Carolyn’s arms on the morning of their 62nd wedding anniversary after battling pulmonary fibrosis.

Warner was among the first physicians to envision the essential role that computers would play in medicine and healthcare delivery. His landmark work involving computer-patient interviews, begun during the 1960s, anticipating by decades the now-prevalent field of electronic medical records. He was a strong advocate for patient rights in what became HIPAA.  As his son, the author Charlie Slack wrote:

[Warner Slack’s] article “The Patient’s Right to Decide,” published in the British journal The Lancet, put forth a then-radical idea of “patient power”—encouraging patients and physicians alike to overturn the traditionally paternalistic nature of healthcare. Patients, Dr. Slack believed, should play a crucial part in determining their own care. Their insight, he often said, was “the least utilized resource in healthcare.’

A New Jersey native, Warner went on after Princeton to graduate from Columbia University’s College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1959. He served as a captain in the U.S. Air Force in the Philippines during the Vietnam War.  He later returned to the University of Wisconsin at Madison in the Departments of Medicine and Computer Science, where he had done his residency, and where he subsequently developed the first computer-based medical history system.  In 1970 he was recruited to Harvard. From 1989 to 1998 Dr. Slack was editor in chief of the journal MD Computing. Active in civil and humanitarian causes, Warner participated in the 1965 Selma to Montgomery Freedom March, was co-founder of Faculty and Students for Equality at University of Wisconsin, and even into his 70’s traveled to Honduras to provide humanitarian medical assistance.

 Warner V. Slack dry-erase board mural
A dry-erase board mural shared on the reflections site of the Harvard Medical Faculty Physicians Informatics Department, http://hmfpinformatics.org/slack/?show_all=true

Loved ones recall his warmth, optimism, gentleness, and generosity. He was happiest spending time with Carolyn and family at their cabin on Meddybemps Lake in Maine. A long-time Newton, MA resident, he was a trustee of Lasell College.

Warner’s classmates remember him as a warm-hearted and deeply effective leader of Princeton AlumniCorps, from its inception as Project 55 to his last days. His engagement and support ran the gamut – from assembling Fellowship mentors every year to organizing events in Boston to mentoring many Project 55 Fellows himself over the years. He also supported AlumniCorps’ mission with his time and thoughtful advice as a board member, and with his generous financial giving. As classmate George Hackl reflects, “In his self-effacing way Warner was the epitome of everything we strive to be at AlumniCorps.” On his website Ralph Nader ’55 recalls, “I called Dr. Slack to express my deepest admiration and said: ‘For all your adult life, Warner, you have been a physician’s physician, a patient’s physician, a student’s physician, a citizen’s physician, and a champion of peace and justice.’ “

In addition to his wife of 62 years, Dr. Slack is survived by daughters Alison and Jennifer, son Charlie, and seven grandchildren.