Why Support Princeton AlumniCorps?

Princeton AlumniCorps is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. As such, we rely on the generosity of donors like you, who provide more than 80% of our operating budget. With nearly three decades of experience working with nonprofits and other civic-minded organizations across the country, AlumniCorps leads the charge to develop talent, create networks, and nourish a pipeline of effective leaders in the nonprofit sector. Each year our programs in Boston, Chicago, New York, San Francisco, New Jersey, and Washington, DC provide mentorship, training, and professional development to almost 100 talented and passionate university graduates, Emerging Leaders, and ARC Innovators who directly affect thousands of people served by our partner organizations.

Your contribution ensures that the next generation of nonprofit leaders working in community development, social services, education, the environment, civic service, and more, can develop the skills and knowledge they need to effect long-term, systemic social change.


We’ve launched a special fundraising appeal focused on our Project 55 Fellowship & Internship alumni, with a target of $27,000 by June 30, 2018. To help inspire these program alumni, we shared photos of years gone by asking “Remember YOUR Princeton Project 55 experience?” In addition, current and continuing Fellow Anna Walker ’17 (pictured below), who is working at Partners for the Common Good in Washington, DC, wrote a heartfelt letter to the program alumni, outlining three reasons why she will always support the program.

Photo captions: (a) Anna (3rd from left) and her coworkers & PP55 Fellow Hayley Roth ’17 (right), at the Opportunity Finance Network Conference in Sept. 2017. (b) Anna with Hayley in the office. (c) Anna at training on the fundamentals of the opportunity finance industry hosted at Self-Help Credit Union.

First: No other university has a program like Project 55 (PP55). In all my conversations with recent graduates from other universities, I’ve found that only Princeton has a nonprofit fellowship program created and funded by alumni. I like to think that we Tigers are an exceptional bunch, and PP55 certainly cements that conviction.

Second: The support I received from Project 55 throughout the job search and application process. Instead of sending dozens of cover letters into the ether, never to be heard from again, I had PP55 staff, program alumni, and peers who could help me prepare for an interview, offer advice for placements, and even give a nudge to organizations I had interviewed with to improve my chances for a fulfilling post-graduate job. To have the guidance, reassurance, and support of PP55 staff and infrastructure during that process helped me and many other Fellows maintain our sanity.

Lastly: Former Fellows and Princeton alumni who welcomed me and the other Fellows into their homes and lives. Starting a new job in a new city with new people is difficult. Thanks to the PP55 network, a welcoming committee of local Princetonians awaits each PP55 Fellow. From backyard barbecues to cultural events to individual mentors, PP55 has connected me with fascinating people who have supported and guided me during my Fellowship. The best way I know to thank all those people who have welcomed the DC Fellowship class is to give my own time and expertise to future Fellows and the PP55 program.

Regional Updates – Spring 2018

Boston

Cassie Crifase ’17 and Daniel Rounds ’17, current PP55 Fellows in Boston.

The six Fellows in Boston have been busy! In particular, two future physicians reflected on how much their Fellowships are teaching them in our Leading Edge blog. Daniel Rounds ’17 is providing a quality education for young students in Lawrence, MA at Community Day Arlington Elementary School. He shared, “Lawrence is a city defined by immigration, and I hope to work with migrant populations in the future as a physician.”

Cassie Crifase ’17 is working on a longitudinal airway study at Massachusetts General Hospital’s EMNet, and she says, “Working on the WIND Study has granted me a unique window into the lives of our participants, offering me multiple perspectives into the storied history of each parent and child… it has instilled a fervor for my chosen career as a physician as well as a humanity that can sometimes be lost in the study of a physiology textbook or the sterility of an operating theatre.” Read all of Cassie & Daniel’s reflections on The Leading Edge blog.


Chicago

In Chicago several Princeton AlumniCorps Fellows and former Fellows attended an event at the Princeton Club of Chicago on March 27, 2018. Juan Jose Gonzalez ‘06 spoke about his role as Director of Youth and Education policy for the City of Chicago, while Chris Mallette ‘93, Executive Director of the Chicago Violence Reduction Strategy, a part of National Network for Safe Communities, shared his experience in public service. Pictured, left to right: Juan Jose Gonzalez ’06, Whitney Spalding Spencer ’07, Josh Lau s’07, Felix Huang ’07, Nora Niazian ’17, Kirsten Ekdahl Hull ’99, Adjoa Mante ’17, Briana Payton ’17, Rebecca Deaton ’91, Andrew Hahm ’17, Nat Piggee ’96, and Chris Mallette ’93.

On February 21, Chicago Fellows got the chance to learn from Seth Green ’01 (pictured above with a tie), Founding Director of the Baumhart Center for Social Enterprise and Responsibility at Loyola University at an area committee seminar. Seth spoke about his career in nonprofits, the ins and outs of working with boards, and the importance of an effective fundraising strategy.

Friends of AlumniCorps who tuned in to CBS’s 60 Minutes on January 7 may have heard a familiar voice: Former Project 55 Fellow Chris Mallette ’93 spoke about how police and communities in Chicago are working together with a unique program relying on science and the human touch to curb the city’s infamous murder rate. Learn more about Chris’s feature on the 60 Minutes CBS News website.


New Jersey

March 10, 2018. Tom Magnus ’77, Mercy Salaz Byrne ’83, Tim Byrne ’83, Justine Hamilton ’17, Harold Cotton-Max ’91 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Schuyler Softy ’11, Marcos Vigil ’97 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Aaron Buchman ’08, Margarita Rosa ’74, Marsha Rosenthal ’76, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17, Michael Buchman ’73, Kevin Reich ’00.

On March 10 the New Jersey Area Committee hosted a seminar on “How to Stay Involved in Nonprofit Organizations” featuring a morning keynote by former AlumniCorps board member Margarita Rosa ’74, and a panel on “Life After the Fellowship” moderated by Aaron Buchman ’08. Panelists were Lauren Peccoralo ’01, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Kevin Reich ’00, Schuyler Softy ’11. Paul Nehring ’10 served as discussant.

Margarita Rosa ’74 gave the morning keynote at the NJ Area Committee’s 3/10/18 event.

About 30 people came out to the day’s events, held at AlumniCorps’ offices at 12 Stockton Street, Princeton. Pictured, from left to right: Tom Magnus ’77, Mercy Salaz Byrne ’83, Tim Byrne ’83, Justine Hamilton ’17, Harold Cotton-Max ’91 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Schuyler Softy ’11, Marcos Vigil ’97 (current AlumniCorps Board member), Aaron Buchman ’08, Margarita Rosa ’74, Marsha Rosenthal ’76, Stephanie Ramos ’00, Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17, Michael Buchman ’73, Kevin Reich ’00.

 

 

 


New York

Attendees at the NY Steering Committee’s 4/10/18 meeting: Amy Olivero ’13 (board member), Scott Taylor ’75, Judy Surratt s’55 (board member), Moriah Akers ’14, Andrew Protain ’08 (board member), Kef, Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Maria Katarina Rafael ’15, Andrew Goldstein ’06, Molly O’Neill ’14. Taking the picture: Olympia Moy ’05.

On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 the New York Steering Committee met to plan activities and seminars for the incoming cohort of Project 55 Fellows. They were joined by AlumniCorps President & Executive Director Kef Kasdin ’85. Attendees included Amy Olivero ’13 (board member), Scott Taylor ’75, Judy Surratt s’55 (board member), Moriah Akers ’14, Andrew Protain ’08 (board member), Kef, Rainah Berlowitz ’97, Maria Katarina Rafael ’15, Andrew Goldstein ’06, Molly O’Neill ’14. Taking the picture: Olympia Moy ’05.


Washington, DC

The Washington, DC Area Committee hosted a seminar on the State of Public Education in DC. Attendees included two current Fellows—Furman Haynes ’17 and Tess Bissell ’17— a past Fellow—Joelle Deleveaux ’16— and Clara Botstein ’07. The event was held at CityBridge Education’s offices at the Watergate in DC. Attendees heard from Catharine Bellinger ’15 (pictured left) of Democrats for Educations Reform (DFER) DC and Maggie Bello (pictured right), Chief Academic Officer of Two Rivers Public Charter School.

2017-18 Princeton Project 55 Fellows

This year’s Project 55 Fellow placements are complete! We received 161 completed applications from students and recent alumni, and 47 Fellows have confirmed acceptance to the 2017-18 Program. We also have four continuing Fellows who are returning to their partner organization and wish to fully participate in the Fellowship program for a second year. Orientation was held for incoming Fellows on May 12, 2017; 34 Fellows were in attendance.

via GIPHY

Bay Area
Nickolas (Nick) Dreher ’17
UCSF

Hannah Kraus ’17
Aspire Public Schools

Kristina Phillpotts-Brown ’17
Greater Oakland Public Schools

Andrew Schilling ’17
UCSF

Boston
Audrey Abend ’17
OpenBiome

Cassandra (Cassie) Crifase ’17
Emergency Medicine Network at Massachusetts General Hospital

Kelly Hatfield ’17
The Community Group

Daniel Rounds ’17
The Community Group

Monica Seng ’17
OpenBiome

Chicago
Andrew Hahm ’17
Carole Robertson Center for Learning

Zena Kesselman ’17
Illinois State Board of Education

Michael Manning ’17
New Markets Support

Adjoa Mante ’17
Sinai Community Institute

Nora Niazian ’17
Center for Economic Progress

Briana Payton ’17
North Lawndale Employment Network

Marlyse Vieira ’17
Chicago Volunteer Legal Services

New Jersey

Justine Hamilton ’17
Princeton Internships in Civic Service, Princeton University

Trust Kupupika ’17
International Schools Services

Sahand Keshavarz Rahbar ’17
Princeton AlumniCorps

New York

Akua Achampong ’17
New Community Corporation

Vivien Bazarko ’17
Reach Out and Read

Janine Cadet ’17
New Alternatives for Children

Julie Chen ’17
Brooklyn Defender Services

Eleanor (Ellie) DeGarmo ’17
New York Academy of Medicine

Veronica Edwards ’17
Readworks

Danielle Howell ’17
Coalition for Hispanic Family Services

Minji Kim ’17
Association to Benefit Children

Juliana (Julie) Lopez ’17
Coalition for Hispanic Family Services

Monica Magalhaes ’17
Vital HealthCare Capital

John (Jack) Marsh ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Colleen O’Gorman ’17
All In Together

Ashley Richards ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Piyapat (Poupae) Sinsub ’17
Housing Development Fund

Jenna Spitzer ’17
City Year

Hannah Srajer ’17
Association to Benefit Children

Alice Tao ’17
New York Center for Child Development

Durva Trivedi ’17
Rockefeller Foundation

Hannah Vester ’17
New York District Attorney’s Office

Gelila Yohannes ’17
New York Academy of Medicine

Washington, D.C.

Salwa Ahmad ’17
Aeras

Tess Bissell ’17
College Summit

Laurel Easterling ’17
Aeras

Richard (Furman) Haynes ’17
CityBridge Foundation

Alexandra (Lexi) Mairone ’17
Humanity United

Hayley Roth ’17
Partners for the Common Good

Anna Walker ’17
Partners for the Common Good

AlumniCorps: inspiration + unearthed passions for Toni Murphy ’05

Toni Seaberry Murphy ’05, Former PP55 Intern at the Community Development Financial Institutions (CDFI) Fund, Washington, D.C.

Toni Murphy ’05 (left) with her husband and three children.

Which aspect of your internship was most impactful to you and why?

I enjoyed the different Project 55 gatherings for alumni and folks working in DC. I remember going to one such gathering at the home of a U.S. Senator who was a Princeton alumnus. It was amazing – I was 18 and being exposed to different circles of people with power and influence.

We were in the midst of the tech boom/ bust, and the housing market was severely affected. We were determining which local banks to fund based on their role in the local economy in different parts of the U.S. I loved working for CDFI because it was altruistic, but it helped me understand financial markets. My internship gave me a window into the financial world and set the bar high. Had it not been for my Project 55 Internship, I don’t know if I would have gotten a Bank of America internship the next year and gone into public finance for my sophomore internship.

What advice would you offer a Princetonian who’s considering a PP55 Fellowship?

Working with an organization like the CDFI Fund as a PP55 Intern/ Fellow gives you a great entree into the business world with the safety net and support of your alumni family to ensure your success. You can enter the workforce without all the brokering you usually have to do to get into the system. With PP55 you’re allowed to make mistakes and learn from the ground up.

Why give to Princeton AlumniCorps?

When I give to AlumniCorps, it’s easy to see where my money is going. I find that the mission is clear, the influence is there, it’s giving back and paying it forward. AlumniCorps is a small, nimble organization and I know my dollars are going to go a long way.

Why support Princeton AlumniCorps?

Princeton AlumniCorps is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization. As such, we rely on the generosity of our donors, who provide nearly 80% of our operating budget. Our programs in Boston, Chicago, New York, San Francisco, New Jersey, and Washington DC, annually provide mentorship, training, and professional development to approximately 80 talented
passionate university graduates and nonprofit professionals who in turn, directly affect thousands of people served by our partner organizations. Your contribution ensures that the next generation of leaders at nonprofits across the spectrum including community development, social justice, education, the environment, public policy and more, can develop the skills and knowledge they need to effect long-term, systemic social change.

Keystone Society
The Keystone Society is comprised of a select group of donors who have chosen to assure the long-term health and sustainability of Princeton AlumniCorps by including AlumniCorps in their estate planning. Society members know that the assets they commit now will continue to aid AlumniCorps for generations to come, as it develops civic leaders, builds an
expansive community, and creates social impact. For more information on how you can ensure your legacy with AlumniCorps, please visit the Keystone Society website.


Current PP55 Fellow, Ramie Fathy ‘16 (far right, with co-workers at UCSF)

“Project 55 offers a chance to work ‘In the Nation’s Service and in the Service of Humanity’ in a structured, supportive environment with the freedom and time to reflect on one’s efforts, purpose, and ultimate goals. Fellowships involve high impact projects supervised by leaders in the field who are dedicated to our success.”


Former PP55 Fellow, Geoff Mitelman ’00 (pictured holding placard at a march)

“I’m the Founding Director of Sinai and Synapses, which bridges the worlds of religion and science…The work I did [as a Fellow at] Facing History, which uses the Holocaust as a lesson in human behavior, still influences me today. I use many of their methodologies in teaching. Their belief that history is a moral enterprise guides my rabbinate.”


Former PP55 Fellow, Julie Wingerter ’92 (at her 20th reunion with her family)

“The number of amazing PP55 alumni that are working for systemic change in our country is inspiring! These are smart people who are dedicating themselves to helping solve some of society’s toughest problems.”